Tag

low income bail bonds in visalia | Carls Bail Bonds

drunk-driving-in-california-over-the-fourth-of-july

Drunk Driving in California Over the Fourth of July

By | Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Kings County, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds

The Fourth of July is one of those holidays when everyone likes to cut loose and really relax. Most of us get to enjoy a long weekend which means we tend to drink a little more than we normally would. The fact that many of us are hanging out with a large group of our close friends and family makes us even more likely to consume a little more alcohol than normal.

There’s nothing wrong with using some adult-only beverages to help you unwind and enjoy the holiday, provided you do so in a manner that’s safe and legal.

The first thing to make sure of before you pop the first top on your favorite brand of beer is that you are confident you won’t be getting behind the wheel and trying to drive somewhere. California lawmakers aren’t going to lighten up on the drunk driving consequences just because it’s a holiday. In fact, the holiday means that there will likely be even more police patrolling over the Fourth, increasing the odds of you getting caught and arrested for drunk driving.

If you’re convicted of drunk driving in California over the Fourth of July:

  • You could spend anywhere from 96 hours to six months in a county jail
  • Pay a fine that ranges from $390-$1,000
  • Lose your driving privileges for six months

Those penalties are for a first drunk driving offense. They become increasingly more severe with each subsequent offense. It’s also important to understand that if you get into an accident while you’re driving drunk and someone is hurt or killed, you’ll face additional charges and consequences.

Getting behind the wheel after you’ve been drinking during the Fourth of July holiday is one of the worse things you can do. However, don’t assume that just because you’re not driving that you won’t get in trouble if you get drunk while you’re in public.

Examples of public intoxication include:

  • Doing something dangerous to yourself and/or others such as walking into oncoming traffic
  • Being extremely belligerent and saying/doing things you normally wouldn’t have done if you were sober, such as saying things that could result in a bar fight
  • Doing something that obstructs a public way and refusing to let traffic pass
  • Refusing to follow the directions of a police officer

Most people think of public intoxication as a kind of joke charge, but you won’t be laughing if you’re convicted. Public intoxication is a misdemeanor and carries a maximum sentence of six months in jail and/or a $1,000 fine.

Stay safe and be smart this Fourth of July!

mislabeling-food-in-california

Mislabeling Food in California

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Kings County, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds, Los Angeles Bail Bonds

Mislabeling food in California is a law that usually only impacts people who own or operate things like coffee shops, delis, grocery stores, and restaurants. It doesn’t matter how badly the food was mislabeled, if evidence of mislabeling exists, the people involved will be arrested and charged with mislabeling of food. If convicted, they’ll not only have a permanent criminal record, it’s unlikely that they’ll ever be able to find employment in the food industry ever again.

The issue of mislabeling food in California is dealt with in Health & Safety Code 114087 HS.

The law states:

“(a) Food offered for human consumption shall be honestly presented in a way that does not mislead or misinform the consumer.

(b) Food or color additives, colored overwraps, lights or other misleading artificial means shall not be used to misrepresent the true appearance, color, or quality of food.”

There are several different reasons ways that a business can get into trouble for mislabeling food.

These include:

  • A retailer taking food that has either passed its expiration date or is actually meant for pets and passing it off as food that is fit for human consumption
  • Labeling food in such a way that it results in the consumer not having the proper information about things like quality, calories, or even accurate ingredients.

It’s worth noting that while most people assume a person who is charged with mislabeling food in California acts intentionally, that’s not always the case. Even if the food was accidentally mislabeled, the person involved could be charged on grounds of criminal negligence.

Violating Health and Safety Code 114395 HS is a misdemeanor. If convicted, the defendant faces a maximum sentence of six months in jail and/or a fine that ranges from $25 to $1000. It is also likely that the health department will take a long look at the business and potentially close it down forever.

If someone becomes seriously ill or even dies as a result of the mislabeled food, the defendant will likely face additional criminal and civil charges.

dui-conviction-following-a-suspended-license

Failure to Present a Valid California Driver’s License

By | Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Kings County, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds, Los Angeles Bail Bonds

We’ve all done it at some point or another. We’ve left home without our driver’s license. This isn’t a major deal as long as you are walking or riding around as a passenger. If you’re driving, it has the potential to be a major problem.

In California, you are legally required to have your driver’s license close at hand whenever you’re behind the wheel. It needs to be somewhere that you can easily reach it if a police officer asks for it.

While you may have driven a hundred times without your license in the vehicle, all it takes is getting pulled over once (or worse, being involved in an accident) to discover what happens if you fail to present a valid California driver’s license when it’s asked for.

Some people think that they have the right to refuse to show an officer their driver’s license. That’s not the case. The California Vehicle Code Section 12951 VC makes it illegal to fail to present your driver’s license to an officer if they request it while you’ve been driving a vehicle. Police officers are legally able to request your license if they’ve pulled you over in a routine traffic stop, or if you were a driver who was involved in an accident.

When you read through Vehicle Code Section 12951 you’ll learn that, “the licensee shall have the valid driver’s license issued to him or her in his or her immediate possession at all times when driving a motor vehicle upon a highway…”

It goes on to state that, “the driver of a motor vehicle shall present his or her license for examination upon demand of a peace officer enforcing the provisions of this code.”

If you express that you’re willing to provide your driver’s license but simply failed to have it on you when you got in your car, the failure to present it will be handled as an infraction. It will cost you money, but at least it won’t lead to you developing a criminal record. In this situation, you should expect to pay a $250 fine.

If you straight up refuse to present your license when the officer asks for it, you’ll be charged with a misdemeanor and could potentially spend up to six months in jail.

It’s worth noting that if your license is expired, if it has been suspended, or if you were never licensed to drive a vehicle in the first place, you’ll likely face additional charges and infractions.