Tag

bail bonds in bakersfield | Carls Bail Bonds

visalia bail bonds

California’s Drug Cultivation Laws

By | Bail Bond Articles, Bail Bond Blog, Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bond News, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds, Los Angeles Bail Bonds

Drug cultivation in California is addressed in Health and Safety Code 11379.6 HS. The code clearly states that,

    “every person who manufactures, compounds, converts, produces, derives, processes, or prepares, either directly or indirectly by chemical extraction or independently by means of chemical synthesis, any controlled substance specified in Section 11054, 11055, 11056, 11057, or 11058 shall be punished.”

Getting caught manufacturing, growing, or otherwise producing prohibited drugs in the state could result in a sentence that includes 3-7 years in state prison and a fine as large as $50,000.

In many cases, manufacturing a controlled substance represents only one of the things you’ll be charged with. There are usually several charges filed at once. Additional charges generally include:

If the police suspect you of manufacturing or dealing with a controlled substance in California, the last thing you want to do is make the situation worse. It’s in your best interest to cooperate with the police as much as you can, which includes not doing something like trying to resist arrest. The challenge is cooperating with the police but also not saying anything that could potentially incriminate you, which is why you should contact an experienced criminal defense attorney who has a strong background in cases that involve the manufacturing of controlled substances in California.

Drug cultivation laws involving marijuana can still be a bit confusing to some people. Many mistakenly believed that since marijuana is no a legal recreational drug in California, there are no drug cultivation laws involving marijuana in California. That’s not the case. At this point, the average person can only legally care for a maximum of six marijuana plants at a time. Only individuals who are over 21 can use it, and you can only legally carry 28.5 grams. Some cities have ordinances that prohibit cultivating marijuana outdoors, though you’re still legally able to do so in the comfort of your own home.

bakersfield-bailbonds

Safe Hiking Tips for California’s Trails

By | Bail Bond Articles, Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds, Los Angeles Bail Bonds

California has some of the most beautiful hiking trails in the world. The summertime provides you with the perfect excuse to hit those trails and enjoy some high-quality hikes. Before you do, make sure you take a few minutes to consider your safety.

Be Realistic About Your Fitness

Let’s face it. Most of us aren’t as in shape as we’d like to be. Overdoing it and getting exhausted while on one of California’s hiking trails differs from getting too tired while working out at the gym. It’s far more dangerous. When hiking it’s better to underestimate your stamina and fitness than to overestimate it.

Don’t assume that being out of shape means you shouldn’t go hiking, it just means you need to do a little more planning. Consider both the length of the hike, if there are places to sit, how shaded the trail is, if the terrain is rough or smooth, and the site’s overall elevation before starting your hike. Make sure you’re going to have enough energy to return to your car.

Bring Water

You’re going to get hot quickly. The heat and exertion increase the odds of your dehydrating so make sure you have plenty of water in your pack. Frequently take small sips, even if you don’t think you’re thirsty. Dehydration and heatstroke is something that sometimes catches people by surprise.

Pack a First Aid Kit

When you’re putting together your hiking pack, make sure there is a small, well-stocked first aid kit tucked into it. The first aid kit should include some topical antibiotics, band-aids, and a wrap.

Be Aware of Your Surroundings

While you’re hiking, keep your head up and your eyes off your phone. You need to be aware of your surroundings. Know what people are around you, be ready for wildlife and dogs that are off-leash. Don’t forget to pay attention to any stinging insects.

Let Someone Know Where you Are

Even though you might prefer hiking by yourself, you should at least make sure someone knows what trails you’re going to be on and when you intend to be done hiking. Letting someone in on your itinerary helps them know if you don’t return on time and helps them, direct people, to the area where they should start looking for you.

Don’t assume that just because all of your past hikes have been successful that you won’t get lost or hurt on your next one.

When it comes to hiking, you always want to make safety your priority.

bakersfield-bailbonds

Negligent Discharge of a Weapon in California

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds, Los Angeles Bail Bonds

A California man was recently arrested on the negligent discharge of a weapon charge. In this particular case, the man was allegedly firing BBs at passing traffic. It’s unclear how many windows he shot out or how much property damage might have occurred. It is estimated that approximately 100 different vehicles were struck by BBs.

Many people aren’t aware of what a charge of negligent discharge of a weapon in California means.

To learn the exact ins and outs of this particular charge, you have to look at California’s Penal Code (PC) 246.3 PC. When you read through it, you’ll discover that California lawmakers determined that a firearm was being used in a negligent way whenever the person handling the gun did so in a manner that could easily result in another person getting hurt, or in a grossly negligent manner.

One of the interesting things about this particular charge is that for the charges to stick, the prosecutor must be able to prove that you willfully fired the gun and that you understood that doing so could result in someone getting hurt or possibly even killed. You can’t be charged with negligent discharge of a weapon if firing the gun was an accident or if you couldn’t reasonably expect someone was going to get hurt.

Negligent discharge of a weapon is one of California’s wobbler laws. Whether you’re charged with a felony or misdemeanor depends on the circumstances surrounding the event, how many people were involved, criminal history.

If you’re convicted of misdemeanor negligent discharge of a weapon in California, you could be sentenced to a full year in jail and fined up to $1,000. You’ll likely be asked to make restitution and possibly be required to take some gun safety classes.

If you’re convicted of felony negligent discharge of a weapon in California, the sentencing could include:

  • Up to three years in jail
  • A fine that could be as large as $10,000
  • Felony probation

Felony negligent discharge of a weapon is part of California’s Three Strikes law. That means that if you’ve been convicted of this felony before, the second conviction means twice the maximum sentence length, so instead of three years in jail, you could be sentenced to six. The third conviction of this particular crime, you can be sentenced to 25 to life in prison.

The seriousness of this particular charge proves why you should always be careful and use your common sense while you’re handling a firearm.

bakersfield-bailbonds

Keeping Your Kids Safe this Summer

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds, Los Angeles Bail Bonds

Summer is finally here which means long days and lots of freedom for your kids.

While you want your kids to have a great time and make lots of good memories this summer, you also want them to stay safe. The good news is that it’s possible to do both.

Preventing Heat Stroke

One of the summertime dangers parents don’t always think about is heatstroke. While heatstroke in kids is rare, it does happen and it can be deadly.

Most cases of heatstroke in kids occur in cars. The inside of a car can heat up quickly during the summer months and if a child is strapped into a car seat, they can quickly develop a case of fatal heatstroke. This usually happens when a guardian has completely forgotten the child in the car.

The best way to make sure you never accidentally leave your child in the car while you run into the store is by creating a reminder. One grandmother puts her shoes near the car seat. Other parents stick a note on their steering wheel. Some put their purses or cell phones next to their infant. What you do isn’t important as long as it makes it impossible for you to accidentally leave your child in the car alone this summer.

Don’t fool yourself into thinking that since you’re only going to be away from the car for a moment or two, that it’s okay to leave your child alone. It’s not. A single delay can be deadly. Even if your child is sleeping, take them with you.

If you don’t want to bring your child into the doctor/bank/grocery store. Have a responsible adult stay in the car with them. Make sure you leave the car running and the air conditioner parked. If possible, park in the shade. Make it clear that the person watching your child is not to leave the vehicle unless they take the child with them.

While Playing Outside

While it’s unusual for kids to suffer from heatstroke while playing outside, young bodies appear to have an easier time adapting to elevated temperatures than adult bodies, it can happen. The best way to prevent your child from suffering from heat stroke when they are outside playing is making sure they take frequent drinks of cool water and encouraging them to play in the shade during the warmest parts of the day.

Signs that your child is in danger of developing heat stroke are:

  • Muscle cramps
  • Nausea
  • Skin is clammy and cool to the touch
  • Your child’s body temperature has surpassed 104˚ Fahrenheit.

If you suspect your child is suffering from heatstroke, the first thing you need to do is get them to sit down somewhere that is cool. Encourage them to drink something cool, preferably which contains electrolytes. Wipe them with a cool damp cloth.

If your child doesn’t start to recover quickly or frequently suffers from bouts of heatstroke, you should seek medical assistance.

tips-to-help-you-get-ready-to-file-your-2020-tax-return

Tips to Help you Get Ready to File your 2020 Tax Return

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds, Los Angeles Bail Bonds

Yes, it’s only January and your 2020 tax return isn’t due until mid-April, but that doesn’t mean you should ignore that tax season is officially here. The last thing you want to do is wait until a few days before the deadline to file. Turning your thoughts to your tax return now and creating a plan to help you prepare them reduces a great deal of tax season stress.

The key to keeping your stress levels low during tax season is creating a plan of attack. Create a list of specific tasks that need to be completed and determine when you’ll do them. You’ll be amazed how much a solid plan of attack smooths out the process of filing your 2020 tax return.

Gather Your Paperwork

Spend the second half of January and the first half of February gathering up all the paperwork you need to complete your 2020 tax return. The paperwork you need to have on hand before you’re ready to start preparing your tax return includes:

  • W2s
  • Documents that indicate itemized expenses such as child care, medical insurance, and educational costs
  • Any 1099s connected to freelance contractors you hired throughout the year
  • Donation receipts
  • Mortgage interest payment documents
  • An itemized list of business expenses (if relevant)
  • Investment statements
  • Receipts for any tax-deductible purchases you made throughout the year

Keep all of these documents in a drawer or file that’s specifically dedicated to your 2020 taxes.

Dedicating a few weeks to simply organizing all the paperwork that’s relevant to your 2020 tax returns does three things. One it means you don’t have to constantly stop and look for things while you’re preparing your return. Two, you won’t accidentally forget to add something that could impact how much you owe/receive. Three, by gathering all of the documents early, you’ll notice if something is lost and still have time to find/replace the document.

Prepare Your 2020 Tax Return

Set aside a few days in early March to actually prepare your tax return. If you’re handling this on your own make sure you have a block of time when you won’t be interrupted. Give yourself plenty of time. If you find the process overwhelming, divide the process into several small, manageable chunks. By starting to prepare the paperwork in March means you won’t be in a race to complete the work by the April 15 deadline.

When you’re done, save the documentation but don’t submit it to the IRS just yet.

Review your Work

Give yourself a week or two before returning to your completed tax return. Carefully go over every single line and make sure everything is correct. This review process is the best way to avoid making a mistake that could trigger an audit. Once you’re satisfied that everything is accurate, it’s time to officially file your taxes.

Set Up a Payment Plan

If you’re getting a refund from the IRS, you can sit back and wait for the check to appear. If you discover that you owe taxes, you’ll want to set up a payment plan and stick to it. It’s better to make your payments a few days early than to be late.

Hopefully, this plan of attack for your 2020 tax season takes all the stress out of the process, making it possible for you to file your taxes and also enjoy time with your family and friends.

visalia bail bonds

Understanding Slander in California

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds, Los Angeles Bail Bonds

Most Americans know that the First Amendment grants the right to free speech. The problem that many of us encounter is we don’t fully grasp the differences between free speech and slander.

What is Free Speech?

Many of us interpret the First Amendment to mean that we’re free to say whatever we want, to whomever we want, whenever we want. That’s not the way free speech works. The purpose of free speech is to provide Americans with the ability to openly speak against the government without fear of legal ramifications.

What freedom of speech doesn’t do is allow you to say whatever you want about neighbors, family, and businesses you don’t like.

What is Slander?

The legal definition of slander is, “oral defamation, in which someone tells one or more persons an untruth about another which untruth will harm the reputation of the person defamed. Slander is a civil wrong (tort) and can be the basis for a lawsuit. Damages (payoff for worth) for slander may be limited to actual (special) damages unless there is malicious intent, since such damages are usually difficult to specify and harder to prove. Some statements such as an untrue accusation of having committed a crime, having a loathsome disease, or being unable to perform one’s occupation are treated as slander per se since the harm and malice are obvious, and therefore usually result in general and even punitive damage recovery by the person harmed. Words spoken over the air on television or radio are treated as libel (written defamation) and not slander on the theory that broadcasting reaches a large audience as much if not more than printed publications.”

In California, slander legally takes place when:

  • You say something that you know is untrue
  • When you make a statement that you know isn’t privileged
  • When you make a statement that is said with the intent to do harm or cause an injury

The Legal Consequences of Slander

In California, slander is a civil, not a legal matter. It’s also a case that’s tricky to defend. In this case, the individual who filed the charges has to prove their case. In order to convince a judge to rule against you, they have to prove without a shadow of a doubt that you knew that whatever you said was untrue and that you made the statement knowing that it would harm the individual’s emotions, reputation, or business.

In addition to proving that you did in fact deliberately make slanderous comments, the person who files the charges against you also has to prove to the court that they sustained damages that you should reimburse them for. In addition to actual damages, the filer will also likely seek money to cover their emotional trauma.

The best way to avoid getting into a slander dispute with someone is to make sure you never say anything that you aren’t able to prove. If you’re unsure about the validity of a statement, it’s in your best interest to keep it to yourself.

planning-a-flight-make-sure-youre-on-your-best-behavior

Planning a Flight? Make Sure You’re on Your Best Behavior!

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bond News, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds, Los Angeles Bail Bonds

Most of us have been on a flight where at least one passenger seemed to go out of their way to be difficult. They were loud, overly active, got sassy with the flight attendants, etc. In some cases, the passenger’s bad behavior was amusing. In other situations, it was irritating. Sometimes it even becomes concerning.

The airlines have decided that enough is enough and they are no longer going to tolerate unruly passengers on flights.

Federal safety officials recently announced that they are no longer tolerating bad behavior on flights. The decision was made after multiple airline workers reported that they’d had confrontations with individuals and groups who were flying into Washington D.C. with the intention of joining the protests/riots that shook the U.S. Capitol.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, flights throughout the country experienced, “a disturbing increase in incidents where airline passengers have disrupted flights with threatening or violent behavior. These incidents have stemmed both from passengers’ refusals to wear masks and from recent violence at the U.S. Capitol.”

This is not the first time this issue has come up. Bad behavior on flights has been an ongoing concern since passenger flights first became popular. In 2001, the issue was finally addressed following the 9/11 attacks. Since then, the FAA has continuously explored different methods for identifying and quelling disruptive issues that occur both while in the air and in the actual airport.

Just a few examples of this include a couple who were arrested after they got into an altercation about a bag dispute in the Detroit Metro Airport. Another famous incident involved Alec Baldwin who refused to power off his electronics, despite being asked to do so by a flight attendant.

Stephen Dickson who serves as the administrator for the FAA listened to recent complaints about unruly behavior on flights and signed what is basically a zero-tolerance policy. It’s a one-strike and you’re out policy. If you are accused of being unruly and disturbing the peace while you’re on an airplane, you’ll face serious legal consequences. These extend well beyond being asked to get off the plane.

If you behave badly while in flight, it’s likely you’ll be arrested right after the plane lands. You could be charged up to $35,000 in fines and even serve jail time.

At this point, the FAA considers assaulting or threatening your fellow passengers or the staff who is serving on the plane a disruption of peace. At this point, the order is in effect through March 30. It’s unclear if the FAA will move to extend the order following that date.

If you intend on flying in the next few months, it’s in your best interest to be quiet and on your best behavior until your reach your destination.

what-should-i-do-if-my-family-fights

What Should I Do if My Family Fights?

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds, Los Angeles Bail Bonds

Families fight. Some just happen to fight more than others. The trick to weathering family fights is recognizing the signs that the fight is starting to escalate into something that won’t simply blow over and taking steps to diffuse the situation.

Remove Yourself From the Situation

When a fight is starting to get too loud or you sense comments are about to be made that can’t be taken back, removing yourself from the situation is one of the best things you can do. Go for a walk, take a drive, disappear into your bedroom. Take at least a half-hour which gives everyone a chance to cool down. If you’re in a situation where you can’t walk away, you need to do the next best thing which is taking a deep breath, counting backward from ten, and work to mentally calm yourself down. Even this short mini-break gives you a chance to clear your head and reassess the situation. Don’t assume the family member you’re arguing with will be the person who backs down. When it comes to diffusing family fights, you need to be proactive.

Remove Your Emotions from the Drama

You can’t hope to diffuse a family fight if you let your emotions get the best of you. The better you are at staying cool, calm, and collected during the fight, the sooner the situation will resolve itself. Don’t get caught up in the heat of the moment. Count to three before you respond to each comment. Consider two or three different responses and choose the one that is least likely to infuriate the family member you’re arguing with. Removing your emotions during a family fight accomplishes two things. One, it prevents the fight from escalating. It also lays the groundwork for an honest discussion that clears the air and generates results.

Look for a Compromise

Most family fights break out because one person is irritated by something another did. It could be something simple, like leaving dirty socks on the floor, or something major, like failing to pay the electric bill. The best way to diffuse a family fight that revolves around an irritating habit is by looking for a compromise. Once you learn the true issue behind the fight, take a deep breath, acknowledge the issue, and look for a solution that makes both you and the family member you’re arguing with happy. Make sure you honor the agreement. Once everything has calmed down and you’re by yourself, take some time and review the fight as well as what led up to it. Doing this helps you identify the early warning signs of a family fight and will help you nip the problem in the bud the next time you’re in a similar situation.

When the Situation Got Out of Control

It’s the phone call you never want to get: a friend or family member has been arrested and taken to jail. While this can be an emotional time, it’s crucial to stay clear-headed while you figure out your first steps. Of course, your priority is getting the individual released from jail as quickly as possible; however, several things must take place before that can happen. It is extremely important for everyone to remain calm collected during these moments.

Stay Calm and Don’t Divulge Information

First, remind both yourself and the arrested individual to stay calm. It’s important to think clearly as you proceed with the next steps. If your loved one is speaking to you by phone, remind them not to say anything incriminating. The phone call is most likely being monitored and/or recorded and can be used against them later. They have the right to remain silent, and they should not divulge any unnecessary information before speaking with a lawyer. You can find out where the person is being held and what the charges are, but don’t ask for details.

Contact Us Immediately

If someone you love has been arrested and you need help now, contact Santa Ana Bail Bonds to determine how to proceed. We’ll work with you to ensure your loved one is released as quickly and painlessly as possible. Family helps family, and that is what you get when you come to us for help. We are a family-owned company and we understand the importance of family. Our bail agents will treat you like one of the family, and provide you with the best bail help available in the state of California. We will work quickly and do our very best to make the bail bond affordable for you. After all, we want to help you and your family get through this stressful time as quickly and easily as possible.

partying-during-a-pandemic

Partying During a Pandemic

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds, Los Angeles Bail Bonds

The pandemic has been running our lives since March. There isn’t a single aspect of life that it hasn’t impacted. Many of us have grown tired of all the restrictions the virus has placed on our lives and are starting to rebel against the shutdown lifestyle. Many of us are starting to look at the upcoming holiday season and wondering, “what would happen if I hosted or attended a party during the pandemic?”

Is Partying During a Pandemic Legal?

If you’re wondering if it’s legal to party during a pandemic, you’re unlikely to get a clear response. Most people, including any police officers you speak to, will likely tell you it’s a bad idea. But just because somethings a bad idea, that doesn’t mean it’s illegal, right?

When the pandemic reached California, the governor made the tough decision to ban large gatherings. According to the order, any party that involved 250 or more people was strictly prohibited. Smaller gathering remained legal but only if participants agreed to adhere to social distancing guidelines which include maintaining a 6-foot gap between people who don’t live together.

Are People Partying During the Pandemic

If you’re wondering if people are throwing parties during the pandemic, the answer is yes. If you’re wondering if they are getting in trouble, the answer is also yes. How much trouble largely depends on where the party took place, how many people attended, and if the sight of the large gathering scared the neighbors who called the police.

You would be hard-pressed to find a city that’s more determined to prevent parties than Los Angeles. The strain COVID-19 has placed on the local health care system has been severe. Many city officials are determined to do everything they can to halt the virus in its tracks. This includes doing things like shutting off all the utilities to places where large parties are taking place.

It’s unclear if the city will take more drastic steps, such as arresting people who throw/attend parties if the partying during the pandemic trend continues.

If you are feeling alone and isolated, don’t run the risk of crossing the law by throwing a large party during the pandemic. Try touching base with your favorite people via Zoom, Facebook Live, or Skype. If you desperately need to see people in the flesh, host a small intimate gathering and be diligent about maintaining all social distancing standards.

the-long-lasting-consequences-of-drunk-driving-in-california

The Long-Lasting Consequences of Drunk Driving in California

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds, Los Angeles Bail Bonds

Like all other states, California has taken a hard stance on drunk driving. It isn’t tolerated. If you’re caught behind the wheel after having just a little too much to drink, you’ll face steep consequences that will have a major impact on the overall quality of your life.

California’s Legal Limit

California has different legal limits for different types of drivers. For the average, adult driver in California, anything over a blood alcohol count (BAC) of 0.08% is considered too high to legally drive. For drivers under the age of 21, anything over 0.05% is considered a DUI. Commercial drivers as well as drivers who are involved with a ride-share program aren’t allowed to get behind the wheel if their BAC is above 0.04%

If you are pulled over and the officer believes you’ve been drinking, they’ll likely administer a breath test that measures your BAC. If the BAC is considered close, but not quite at the legal limit, it’s likely you’ll still be arrested. The reason for this is because it can take a little time for the true BAC to be accurate. You’ll receive a second test at the jail. By this point, the BAC level will be accurate. If it’s above the legal limit, the officer will go through with the arrest. Both of the BAC tests are admissible in court. In many cases, the first test is a breath test and the second test is taken via a blood draw.

Penalties of Driving Drunk in California

California lawmakers aren’t playing around when it comes to drunk drivers. The penalties are steep and were designed to scare people into only getting behind the wheel while they’re sober. The penalties become more severe each time you’re charged with a DUI.

First Offense

The first time you’re caught driving while under the influence, the maximum amount of time you can spend in county jail is six months. You’ll also be charged fines that will range from $390-$1,000. Your license will be suspended and you won’t be able to drive for up to six months. Your ignition can be locked for 6 months to one full year, and you’ll only be allowed to drive on a restricted license during that time.

Second Offense

The second DUI charge means a minimum of 92 hours and a maximum of 1 full year in county jail. The court can charge you fines that range from $390-$1,000. You can lose your license for a full two years, making it difficult to work, especially if you live in a rural area. After you get a restricted license, the court can limit your driving with an ignition lock that will remain on your vehicle for up to one year.

Third Offense

The third offense you’re found guilty of DUI charges, you’ll be sentenced to as little as 120 days or as long as one year in jail. You’ll get charged at least $1,800 in fines. You’ll also lose your license for 3 years and potentially have an ignition lock installed on your vehicle for an additional 2 years.

California lawmakers have arranged things so that each DUI conviction remains on your record for a full 10 years.

In addition to actual DUI penalties, if you were in an accident while driving drunk, you will also face any charges that were incurred during the accident. This can include minor traffic offenses or vehicular manslaughter.

Medications Can Mess up Your Life

There are several medications that can play havoc on your body when you mix them with alcohol. The problem with many medications, even some over-the-counter allergy medications is that they alter the way your body absorbs alcohol. This means that if you go to the bar and have your normal amount of alcohol, and the amount that in most cases allows you to legally drive home, the medication could have created a significantly higher blood alcohol level and you’ll be arrested for DUI. Several people have had their lives destroyed because they didn’t realize how badly the medication and alcohol would react.

If you’re on medication, it’s in your best interest to not get behind the wheel if you have accidentally mixed the alcohol and the medication. Call a friend, get a room, hire a taxi. Do anything other than getting in your car.

hitchhiking-in-california

Hitchhiking in California

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds

Signs warning drivers about the dangers of picking up hitchhikers the sides of California’s highways. Upon seeing these signs, most of us assume that we’re close to one of the state’s prisons and that cops are worried that a hitchhiker could be an escaped convict. Few of us know that the reason there are so many signs warning about hitchhikers scattered along California’s immense span network of highways is because hitchhiking is actually illegal.

The issue of hitchhiking is addressed in CA Veh Code § 21957 (2018) 21957. The law states that “No person shall stand in a roadway for the purpose of soliciting a ride from the driver of any vehicle.”

Clearly, the law doesn’t want anyone hitchhiking, but what if you’re vehicle has broken down and you need a ride into town? Are you supposed to walk the whole way? And what if you pick up a hitchhiker?

It’s obvious that the law was created to discourage hitchhiking, but it’s the language you want to pay particular attention to. It states that you can’t stand in the middle of the road and try to flag oncoming traffic down and asking for a ride. If one of California’s highway patrol officers catches you doing so, they’ll likely stop and ask you to move off the road. They might even issue a ticket.

However, according to the strict language of the law, you are free to stand on the shoulder of the road and attempt to flag down an approaching vehicle. The trick is, you have to do it in such a way that you’re not disrupting traffic.

If you are a driver who spots someone who wants a lift, you’re allowed to stop and offer them one, but not if you’re on one of the state’s massive freeways. Stopping on the shoulder of one of those could disrupt the flow of traffic and cause a serious accident. You’ll have to somehow signal to the hitchhiker that you’ll meet them at the next exit.

It doesn’t matter if you’re the person offering a hitchhiker a ride or if you’re the person accepting the ride, it’s important to remember that inviting a stranger into your car is a risk. Make sure you use sound judgment and are very careful.

disorderly-conduct-in-california

What Is Disorderly Conduct?

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds

What Is Disorderly Conduct?

When it comes to laws, there are plenty of terms that people hear regularly. Despite that, some of the terms are a bit unclear for people. Take for instance disorderly conduct. What exactly does that term mean? What counts as disorderly conduct?

Disorderly conduct is a broad term that covers a variety of different acts that could be considered disruptive to the general public. Knowing this can help a person avoid getting into any trouble with the law.

California’s Disorderly Conduct Laws

There are a couple of different laws here in California that can fall within the category of disorderly conduct. For starters, there is Penal Code (PC) 647. This is California’s primary disorderly conduct law and covers a variety of different activities. Some other laws that can be considered disorderly conduct include:

  • PC 404 Rioting
  • PC 415 Disturbing the Peace
  • PC 416 Failure to Disperse
  • PC 602 Trespassing

For starters, PC 647 lists all of the following acts as disorderly conduct:

  • Lewd conduct in public. This occurs when people perform lewd or sexual acts in public.
  • Prostitution. This is pretty self-explanatory, but for those unaware, this occurs whenever someone pays or gets paid for a sexual act with another person.
  • Aggressive panhandling. Panhandling is legal, however, being very aggressive with it is not. A person cannot accost or harass another person while asking for money.
  • Squatting. This occurs when a person lives in another person’s home or building without permission from the owner to do so.
  • Public intoxication. This doesn’t mean a person can’t be drunk in public. This just means that a person cannot be so drunk that they become a threat to the safety of others and themselves.
  • Loitering. This occurs when someone hangs around on someone’s property with the intent of committing a crime.
  • Peeping. This occurs when a person is loitering on someone’s property with the intent of peeking into an inhabited building.
  • Invasion of privacy. This occurs when a person uses a device to peek into and/or record someone’s home, a private bathroom, or changing room.
  • Revenge Porn. This occurs when a person distributes pornographic images or videos of a person without his/her permission.

Under California law PC 404, rioting is defined as 2 or more people doing the following without legal permission:

  • Using force or violence.
  • Disturbing the peace.
  • Threatening to use force or violence and having the means to back up that threat.

Under PC 415, disturbing the peace is defined as a person playing excessively loud music, fighting with someone, or using offensive language to start a fight.

PC 416, failure to disperse, occurs when a person assembles or gathers for the purpose of disturbing the public and then failing to leave after being ordered to do so by law enforcement agents.

Lastly, PC 602 defines trespassing here in California. Under this law, it is illegal for a person to enter or remain on someone else’s property without their permission.

Penalties for Disorderly Conduct

Anyone who commits one of the above acts is guilty of disorderly conduct and will face penalties under one of the above laws. PC 647 is a misdemeanor offense that comes with:

  • Up to 6 months in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • Misdemeanor probation.

PC 404 is also a misdemeanor offense that comes with:

  • Up to 1 year in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.

PC 415 is a wobbler offense that can be charged as an infraction or a misdemeanor depending on the facts of the case. The worst penalties for disturbing the peace are:

  • Up to 90 days in county jail.
  • A max fine of $400.

PC 416 is another misdemeanor offense that comes with:

  • Up to 6 months in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • Paying restitution for any damages caused by the crime.

Trespassing is usually charged as either an infraction or as a misdemeanor but can be charged as a felony in rare instances. The first time someone trespasses on a particular piece of land, they will face an infraction charge that comes with a $75 fine. A second offense on the same piece of land sees the fine increase to $250. A third, or any subsequent offense, earns a person misdemeanor charges that come with:

  • Up to 6 months in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • Misdemeanor probation.

Trespassing can be charged as a felony when a person makes a credible threat against another individual and then within 30 days of issuing the threat is caught trespassing on the victim’s property or place of work. When this occurs, a person will face:

  • 16 months, 2 years, or 3 years in county jail.
  • A max fine of $10,000.
  • Felony probation.

Just Be Mindful of Others

As one can see, there are plenty of different ways that a person can be accused of disorderly conduct. However, most of these acts are pretty easy to avoid. After all, it is not like a person is faced with the possibility of being in a riot every single day. As long as a person is on their best behavior and doesn’t try to start fights with other people, they will be fine.

whats-the-differences-between-gta-and-joyriding

What’s the Difference between GTA and Joyriding?

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia

What’s the Difference between GTA and Joyriding?

A home is probably the most important thing that a person can own. Right behind that is a car. Having a vehicle allows a person to travel easily and efficiently. With a car, a person can run errands and go to work to earn money for all of their expenses. Owning a car is a very big deal.

Since cars are so important and expensive, it is no wonder that there are laws against stealing motor vehicles. This crime is such a big deal that it gets its own law. Motor vehicles are some of the only possessions that a person can own that is protected by its own law. Every other item is simply protected under regular theft laws.

What Is the Crime of Stealing a Car?

All theft in California is broken up into two different categories, grand theft and petty theft. The distinction between these two crimes is the value of whatever was stolen. If the total is less than $950, then it was petty theft under Penal Code (PC) 488. It the value was over $950, then it is grand theft under PC 487.

Cars get a special distinction under PC 487(d)1 called grand theft auto (GTA). This makes the crime of grand theft auto a subsection within the crime of grand theft. This is because most cars are valued at over $950. Under PC 487(d)1, grand theft auto is defined as a person taking another person’s vehicle without their permission, with the intent of depriving that person of the vehicle, either permanently or for some time.

Another, similar but different crime, is joyriding. Vehicle Code (VC) 10851 defines joyriding and it sounds almost identical to grand theft auto. The key difference between the two crimes is the intent. With grand theft auto, the person intends to steal the car, whereas with joyriding, the person has no intention of stealing the car, just taking it for a drive.

What Are the Penalties for GTA and Joyriding?

Since grand theft auto is a subsection of grand theft, it carries the same penalties. This means that the crime is a wobbler and can be charged as either a misdemeanor or as a felony depending on the facts of the case and the person’s criminal record. Despite this fact, the crime is typically charged as a felony here in California. As such, the crime of GTA can come with the following penalties:

  • 16 months, 2 years, or 3 years in county jail.
  • A max fine of $10,000.

If a person has a prior conviction of auto theft on their record then they can face an increase in their jail sentence ranging from 2, 3, or 4 years in county jail.

If the stolen car was valued at over $65,000, the person can face an additional year in jail. If the vehicle was valued at over $200,000 then the person can face an additional 2 years in jail.

The crime of joyriding is also a wobbler offense. When charged as a misdemeanor, a person can face:

  • Up to 1 year in county jail.
  • A max fine of $5,000.

When the crime is charged as a felony, a person will face:

  • 16 months, 2 years, or 3 years in county jail.
  • A max fine of $10,000.

The consequences for this crime get worse if the person took an emergency service vehicle, such as a police car or an ambulance, for a joyride or has a previous car theft conviction on their record.

Don’t Steal Someone’s Vehicle

Cars are very important parts of most people’s daily lives. Without constant transport, a person can have a hard time getting to wherever they need to go, such as work or the grocery store. This is why cars are so valuable and why it is such a big deal if a person steals one. If someone steals a car, they better be prepared to deal with some harsh consequences.

can-helping-someone-get-you-into-trouble

Can Helping Someone Get You Into Trouble?

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds

Can Helping Someone Get You Into Trouble?

When it comes to friends and family, most people will do whatever they can to help out their loved ones. If someone that they care about is in trouble, they will not rest until they have helped get their loved one out of trouble. This is how a family is supposed to work in most instances, however, there are times where helping someone can get a person into trouble.

When some people get into trouble, they prefer to avoid the consequences rather than face them. Unfortunately, this practice only ever makes things worse. This is especially true when a person is running from law enforcement officers. By doing so, they only provide more reasons for them to be arrested. On top of that, if any of their friends and family members help them in avoiding arrest, then they could wind up in legal trouble too.

What Is Aiding and Abetting

Helping a loved one hide or run from police officers is a form of aiding and abetting. This crime is described under Penal Code (PC) 31 as a person encouraging, facilitating, or aiding another individual with a criminal act.

Running from law enforcement is just one example of aiding and abetting a criminal. As stated above, a person is guilty of aiding and abetting a criminal whenever they help someone else commit an illegal act. This includes running from the police since that is resisting arrest.

If a person helps with any aspect of the crime, from the planning stage to helping hide the person afterward, then they are guilty of aiding and abetting. Even if a person didn’t help someone plan the crime, they can be guilty of aiding and abetting if they learn of the illegal act and do nothing to stop it.

The Penalties of PC 31

The consequences of aiding and abetting are very unique here in California and can be pretty severe. Under PC 31, a person is never actually charged with aiding and abetting. Instead, this crime simply labels the person as an accomplice to the crime. This makes it so that the person can then be charged with whatever crime they helped the other person commit.

If a person commits a particularly bad crime, such as rape or murder, then whoever aided and abetted them will face those harsh consequences as well, even if they weren’t involved in the actual act.

If a person helped someone after the crime was committed, then they can be labeled as an accessory after the fact. Under this definition, a person would be considered obstructing justice. In these instances, a person will likely face lighter charges than the person they helped. However, those charges can still be pretty high. For instance, a person faces 9 years in state prison for carjacking. The consequence of an accessory after the fact is up to 3 years in state prison.

It is also important to note that a person can be found guilty of the harsher crimes that another person committed even if they didn’t intend for that crime to be committed. For example, if two people are robbing a store. One is the getaway driver and the other goes into rob the place. If the person inside kills someone, the getaway driver can also be charged with murder even though they never intended for anyone to get killed. This is because the murder was a natural and probable consequence of the robbery.

Don’t Help with Crimes

Trying to help friends and family members is almost always a good thing to do. However, there are times when it shouldn’t be done. When someone is contemplating committing a crime or is committing a crime, the last thing their friends and family members should do is help them with the illegal activity. Doing so makes them an accessory to the crime.

Once a person becomes an accessory to the crime, under PC 31, they can face all of the same penalties their loved one would face for committing the crime. In this instance, helping their loved one would only make things worse.