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Consequences of Violating Court Order California

By | Bail Bonds in Kings County, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia

When the court issues an order, you have no choice but to follow it. Failing to adhere to the court order will only make an already bad situation even worse.

While you might consider violating a court order to be an act of rebellion, California lawmakers don’t. As for as California lawmakers are concerned, anyone who intentionally and purposefully engages in an action that goes directly against a current court order is guilty of a crime and will be charged.

The legal issues surrounding the violation of a court order are found in California Penal Code Section 166 PC. It states that:

    “(a) Except as provided in subdivisions (b), (c), and (d), a person guilty of any of the following contempt of court is guilty of a misdemeanor:
    (1) Disorderly, contemptuous, or insolent behavior committed during the sitting of a court of justice, in the immediate view and presence of the court, and directly tending to interrupt its proceedings or to impair the respect due to its authority.
    (2) Behavior specified in paragraph (1) that is committed in the presence of a referee, while actually engaged in a trial or hearing, pursuant to the order of a court, or in the presence of a jury while actually sitting for the trial of a cause, or upon an inquest or other proceeding authorized by law.
    (3) A breach of the peace, noise, or other disturbance directly tending to interrupt the proceedings of the court.
    (4) Willful disobedience of the terms, as written, of a process or court order or out-of-state court order, lawfully issued by a court, including orders pending trial.
    (5) Resistance willfully offered by a person to the lawful order or process of a court.
    (6) The contumacious and unlawful refusal of a person to be sworn as a witness or, when so sworn, the like refusal to answer a material question.
    (7) The publication of a false or grossly inaccurate report of the proceedings of a court.
    (8) Presenting to a court having the power to pass sentence upon a prisoner under conviction, or to a member of the court, an affidavit, testimony, or representation of any kind, verbal or written, in aggravation or mitigation of the punishment to be imposed upon the prisoner, except as provided in this code.
    (9) Willful disobedience of the terms of an injunction that restrains the activities of a criminal street gang or any of its members, lawfully issued by a court, including an order pending trial.”

It is important to note that a few things must happen before you can be convicted of violating a court order.

The first thing the prosecution must prove is that you knew you were violating a court order. If the terms of the court order weren’t explained to you, or if for some reason you were unaware of the court order, you can’t be convicted.

The other thing the prosecution must prove is that you willfully violated the court order. This type of thing comes up the most frequently when dealing with a court order that includes personal protection orders or instructions to avoid certain people. While the court order prohibits you from connecting with specific people, if that person happens to casually encounter you while you’re both running errands, you haven’t actually violated anything, especially if you make a genuine effort to remove yourself from the situation as quickly as possible.

If you’re convicted of violating a California court order, your sentence could include

  • Six months in a county jail
  • Probation
  • $1,000 in fines
  • .

The best way to avoid violating a court order charge is to sit down with a good criminal attorney and have them explain exactly how the court order impacts your life.

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What to do When the Police Want to Question You

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Kings County, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds, Los Angeles Bail Bonds

It doesn’t matter if it’s a phone call asking that you schedule an appointment or if officers knock on your door. Learning that the police want to talk to you is enough to strike terror into your heart, even if you haven’t done anything wrong.

When you learn that the police want to speak to you, you should forget anything you learned from procedural shows. They always imply that you should wait to get a lawyer, that’s a huge mistake.

The police can’t force you to talk to them without a lawyer and contrary to what popular culture might want you to believe, having a lawyer doesn’t automatically make you seem guilty.

Legally speaking, you’re not obligated to speak to the police unless they have presented you with a warrant. However, they aren’t obligated to leave you alone either. If the police believe that you have the information that they need, they can keep contacting you and attempting to set up an appointment. Hiring a lawyer and meeting with them is one of the best ways to resolve the situation quickly.

The main reason you want to hire a lawyer when you’re going to speak to the police is that the lawyer will make sure you don’t say anything that could potentially implicate you and they will also make sure the police follow the strict letter of the law during the questioning.

While you’re waiting for a lawyer, you shouldn’t answer any questions the police try to ask. If you feel compelled to speak, limit your comments to “I’m waiting for my attorney.” While you don’t want to talk to the police without your lawyer, you also don’t want to do anything to offend the police. Don’t slam the door in their face, don’t yell obscenities, and don’t even think about making any threatening comments. It’s in your best interest to stay calm and polite. The only thing losing your temper accomplishes is potentially creating a situation where your behavior inspires the police to press charges against you.

You should also remember that just because the police have asked to talk to you, it doesn’t necessarily mean that they think you’ve done something wrong. In many situations, the police simply want to ask you a few questions that will help them build a case against someone else.

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Prank Calls Aren’t Just Fun and Games

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Kings County, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds, Los Angeles Bail Bonds

It’s not uncommon for kids to go through a phase where they make silly prank calls. These calls are generally thought to be harmless, but what about when they cross the line from being amusing to annoying?

In California, calling a resident and pretending to place an order for a silly pizza won’t usually get you into legal trouble. However, making phone calls sending emails/texts, or posting private messages that are obscene or threatening is a direct violation of California’s Penal Code 653m PC.

The law very clearly states that:

    Any person who, with the intent to annoy, telephone or make contact by means of an electronic communications device with another and addresses to or about the other any obscene language or addresses to the other person any threat to inflict injury to the person or property of the person addressed or any member of his or her family, is guilty of a misdemeanor.

As laws go, this one is fairly straightforward, if you make a call, whether it’s anonymous or to someone you know and use extremely obscene language or make threats, you could be charged with a misdemeanor.

It’s important to note that the prosecutor probably won’t agree to file charges if you simply made some relatively harmless calls that were annoying but not really threatening. However, if you were someone who received some petty annoying calls, got upset, and sent a return message that was considered obscene or threatening, you could face charges.

Another thing you should understand is that words aren’t the only thing that could land you in hot legal water. Sending photos via text/email/PMs can also be considered threatening/obscene/harassing. This has come up in many dating stories where one person sent obscene photos to a love interest who never requested the images and ultimately decided to file charges.

One of the things that is explored during cases that involve annoying calls/messages is the relationship the defendant shares with the alleged victim. The court will take a long look at all the communications the pair shared. If there is evidence that the pair once frequently communicated with obscene language, made comments that never bothered one another before, or frequently sent indecent photos without offending each other, there’s a good chance that the case will be dropped.

If you feel you are the victim of harassing messages, make it very clear to the person sending the messages or making the calls that you’re uncomfortable. Document your complaint so that it can be used as evidence if you do decide to pursue legal charges.

If you are someone who tends to be crude during telephone and written messages, make sure the person you’re communicating with understands your style and is comfortable with it. If they don’t it’s up to you to decide how to best proceed. You can either cut communications or continue speaking to them, knowing that there is a chance they could become so offended they decide to file charges against you.

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Why We Might Request Collateral

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Kings County, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds, Los Angeles Bail Bonds

Sometimes we will only ask you to pay a 10% fee in order to secure your bail bond. Other times we may ask for the 10% fee and some form of collateral. As a rule, we will only require that you present some form of collateral if we feel that you’re a high-risk case. This means that if your history, the type of charges you’re facing, and your connection to the community indicate that you might try to avoid a conviction, we will ask for collateral as an added incentive for you to stay in town and attend all of your court appearances.

The way our process works is that the initial contact we have with you is a free consultation. During this consultation, we’ll ask about the charges that have been filed against you, if you have a history of failure to appear in court charges, as well as some other questions that are designed to help us determine if we should ask for collateral.

Specific things we consider while deciding if you’ll need to present collateral include:

  • How strong your community ties are
  • If you’re currently employed and how long you’ve been employed
  • If you have family that lives in the area and how close your connection is to them
  • If your legal history indicates that you’ll make all your court dates
  • Your credit history

If we feel that you’re a good risk and you’re not asking for what is considered a high bond, it’s likely that we won’t ask that you present us with some form of collateral. However, if you’re considered high risk, we’ll ask for something. Don’t stress if you don’t have any valuable personal possessions, we’re happy to accept collateral from any friends or family members who are willing to help you out.

In addition to being flexible about the collateral, we also enjoy a reputation for being a bail bonds company that works with each client to come up with a payment plan that allows them to continue to pay for things like legal fees, rent, and groceries. We do this by providing zero-interest bail bonds and flexible payment programs.

The first step towards finding out if we’re the bail bonds company that’s right for you is a completely free consultation between yourself and one of the bail bond experts. The consultation provides you with the perfect platform to have all of your questions answered. When you contact us, you will enjoy outstanding customer service, compassion, and discretion.

For additional information, feel free to call (866) 855-3186 or click here to to chat with us now.

What You Should Know When you Need to Make Bail Bonds

What You Should Know When you Need to Make Bail Bonds

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Kings County, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds, Los Angeles Bail Bonds

When you sign a contract with Kings County Bail Bonds you’re entering into a written agreement with us that states in exchange for us posting your bail and helping secure your release from jail, you agree to appear at all of your scheduled court appearances and follow any other rules the court has attached to your bail.

For many people, a bail bond is the only way they will be released since they simply can’t come up with the money on their own.

If you find that you need to make a California bail bond, here is what you need to know.

Make sure the bail bonds company you’re about to work with is genuinely allowed to write a bail bond for you. There are some scam artists in the bail bond industry who are perfectly content to collect a 10% fee from you and disappear with your money, leaving you sitting in a cell and now in even more desperate financial straits than you were before contacting the felonious bail bonds agency.

Kings County Bail Bonds has a history that spans several decades. We’re a fully licensed and insured bail bonds industry that already has a relationship with the court and jail system you’re currently dealing with. When you contact Absolute Bail Bonds, you’ll never have to worry about being let down.

Plan on talking to us. When you contact us, you should be prepared for a kind of two-way mini-interview process. We want to make sure that you’re comfortable with our process and we want to make sure that you’re a good risk. We have made this process easy by creating both phone and online consultations. Each of these consultations is completely free. Not only won’t we charge you for the consultation, but we also won’t pressure you into making an immediate decision. You can contact us 24/7.

Be prepared to read through the California bail bonds contract. This is yet another opportunity to ask us questions and make sure that you feel good about making a bail bond. You will have to present a valid ID when signing the contract. If necessary we can ask the booking officer to retrieve the ID from your personal belongings long enough for us to confirm that you are who you say are.

While there are sometimes things that slow down the process, we can usually have you released from jail in practically no time at all. It normally takes less than four hours. Make sure you have arranged for a ride home.

While we don’t require that each of our clients touches base with us every couple of days, we want you to feel free to contact us if you have any questions or concerns. We would far rather have you touch base with us than have you accidentally do something that will get you arrested for a bail violation.

For additional information, feel free to call (866) 855-3186 or click here to to chat with us now.

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Need Help with Bail? How About One Month Free From Carl’s Bail Bonds

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Kings County, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds, Los Angeles Bail Bonds

We don’t know anyone who factors bail into their budget. It’s one of those things that most people assume they can go their whole life without needing. However, sometimes things don’t work out the way we expect them to. When that happens, and you suddenly find yourself in need of bail, the money isn’t always readily available.

The good news is that we’ve got your back. We understand that times are tough and we’re ready and willing to help. Over the years we’ve helped many people just like yourself by offering a flexible payment plan. If you need bail RIGHT NOW, you’re in luck because it just so happens that we’re running a special that allows you one month without a payment. That gives you time to determine exactly how to work bail into your current budget.

And there’s even more good news. While the one-month free bail bond payment is a promotion, we already have a system in place that’s designed to make bail as budget-friendly as it can be.

First, our fee is just ten percent of whatever you’re set bail is. That means if your bail is set at $20,000, we are only going to charge you $2,000. We’ll take care of the rest.

The key to getting the first month free from Carl’s Bail Bonds In Kings County is putting your best foot forward. Show us that you’re a good risk by presenting us with a credit rating that implies you’re diligent about paying your bills. The better your credit score, the more readily we’ll include you in our first month of free bail program.

If your credit isn’t quite good enough to qualify you for our first-month free bail promotion, you should consider a co-signer who does have a good credit history.

In addition to offering one-month free bail to qualified clients, we also do other things that make applying for bail bonds an appealing option. The first is that we offer a flexible payment plan. We also have a 20% discount available for qualified clients.

The most important way we make bail more affordable is by reducing the amount you have to pay. If you’re assigned a $20,000 bail and decide to pay the entire amount yourself, you’ll be out the full $20,000. The good news is that you’ll eventually get that money back, but it can take months and even over a year for the money to be returned. Can you afford to part with $20,000 for that long?

If you sign a contract with us, we only charge a $2,000 fee in exchange for paying the entire $20,000 to the court system. You won’t get the $2,000 back from us when you’re case is finally resolved, but most people find that it’s still more economically feasible to lose that $2,000 than to be without the $20,000 for several months.

The $2,000 becomes even more affordable when it’s divided into several small, flexible payments. Qualifying for the one-month free bail gives you a solid four weeks to create a budget that allows you to stay on top of your current bills plus make your payments to Carl’s Bail Bonds In Kings County.

Carl’s Bail Bonds In Kings County has over 30 years of experience helping people just like yourself. We offer free consultations, discrete service, and outstanding customer service. We’re California’s most trusted bail bond services.

Contact us as soon as you or a loved one is arrested and find out just what steps we take to quickly provide the necessary bail bond. We’re available 24/7!

For additional information, feel free to call (866) 855-3186 or click here to to chat with us now.

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Failure to Pay Legal Child Support Obligations in California

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Kings County, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds, Los Angeles Bail Bonds

Child support is always a touchy issue. There are a variety of reasons people use for failing to pay legal child support obligations in California. These reasons include:

  • That the amount is more than they can afford and they don’t have enough money left to live on
  • They don’t think their ex (or kids) are entitled to the money
  • They spent the money on other things
  • They paid the money but it has gotten lost in the system

The first thing you have to understand is that once the court has ordered a specific amount of child support to be paid, that is it. You are expected to make the complete payments and the payments should be made on time. Failing to do so is breaking the law.

If you can’t afford to pay the child support or if situations have changed and you no longer feel that the amount you’re paying is fair, you need to contact the court immediately and arrange to have your case reviewed. Until the review happens and the child support order is formally changed, you still have to make the current payments. Failing to keep up with the payments, even when the matter is being discussed, will result in legal action.

Don’t assume that just because you spent the money on something else and no longer have access to the funds, that you won’t have to worry about any legal actions. Not having the money available is not considered a valid reason to fall behind on your child support payments.

If you no longer have the money because of an employment change, medical emergency, or another kind of emergency, it’s in your best interest to alert the court system immediately so they can evaluate your case. Taking a proactive stance is the best way to avoid legal trouble.

The simple truth is that sometimes the system doesn’t work and child support payments become lost. This is why it’s so important to document everything so that you can prove the missing payments weren’t your fault, but rather a clerical error. Don’t assume that because the child support payments you made were lost that you can stop making payments. You still have to submit your child support payment on time until the missing payments are found and reimbursements are made.

The legal consequences of failing to pay child support in California are quite severe. The state could decide to suspend not only your driver’s license but also any professional business licenses you might rely on to make a living. In severe cases, the state could decide that your failure to pay the court-ordered child support is a contempt of court, which could result in serving jail time.

When all is said and done, it’s in your best interest to make every single child support payment on time and in full. If you’re unable to do so, notify the courts immediately.

Do you have a loved one in need of being rescued from jail? If so, (866) 855-3186 or click here to to chat with us now.

The Truth About Breaking and Entering in California

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Kings County, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds, Los Angeles Bail Bonds

People talk about breaking and entering charges all the time, so you’ll probably be surprised to learn that California doesn’t actually have any official breaking and entering laws. Just because California doesn’t have a specific breaking and entering law, it doesn’t mean you can walk into anyone’s house and not expect to face legal consequences. You will, it’s just that California lawmakers created some different terms for what most of us consider breaking and entering.

In most situations, a person who has broken into and entered a property without permission will face multiple charges, one of which is usually a burglary charge.

If burglary charges have been filed against you it’s because the police believe they’ve collected enough evidence to prove that you entered a commercial or residential property with the intention of stealing possessions.

Penal Code 459 PC deals with the topic of burglary. It states that:

    “Every person who enters any house, room, apartment, tenement, shop, warehouse, store, mill, barn, stable, outhouse or other building, tent, vessel, as defined in Section 21 of the Harbors and Navigation Code, floating home, as defined in subdivision (d) of Section 18075.55 of the Health and Safety Code, railroad car, locked or sealed cargo container, whether or not mounted on a vehicle, trailer coach, as defined in Section 635 of the Vehicle Code, any house car, as defined in Section 362 of the Vehicle Code, inhabited camper, as defined in Section 243 of the Vehicle Code, vehicle as defined by the Vehicle Code, when the doors are locked, aircraft as defined by Section 21012 of the Public Utilities Code, or mine or any underground portion thereof, with intent to commit grand or petit larceny or any felony is guilty of burglary.”

In California, you can be charged with either first or second-degree burglary. First-degree burglary is always a felony, but second-degree burglary is one of California’s wobbler crimes, meaning you can be charged with either a misdemeanor or felony.

The sentence connected to a misdemeanor burglary conviction includes:

  • Up to 12 months in a county jail
  • Up to a $1,000 fine
  • Probation

If you’re convicted of second-degree felony burglary, your sentence could include:

  • 16 months-3 full years in a county jail
  • Probation
  • Up to a $10,000 fine

In most burglary cases, additional charges are added to the burglary charge. These charges
frequently include:

Some burglary incidents are the result of a simple misunderstanding which is why it is so important to make sure you clearly have the owner’s permission before entering a private residence or a commercial building.

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Vandalizing a Place of Worship

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Kings County, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds, Los Angeles Bail Bonds

California lawmakers don’t care if you were simply bored and decided adding some graffiti to a church wall would make life more interesting, if you were angry and knocked over some headstones in a local cemetery, or if you disagree with a particular religion and took out your frustration on the property. If you knowingly damage a place that’s legally recognized as a place of worship or a cemetery, you violate California Penal Code 594.3 PC.

Penal Code 594.3 PC clearly states that: “Any person who knowingly commits any act of vandalism to a church, synagogue, mosque, temple, building owned and occupied by a religious educational institution, or another place primarily used as a place of worship where religious services are regularly conducted or a cemetery is guilty of a crime.”

It’s important to understand that California lawmakers not only consider churches, temples, mosques, and synagogues to be places of worship but also include both cemeteries/graveyards and any other building that is either knowingly occupied or used by a religious institution to be a place of worship.

Like so many of California’s laws, PC 594.3 is one of the state’s wobbler laws. This means that the details surrounding the case determine whether you face misdemeanor or felony charges. Most of the time the intent behind the vandalism as well as the amount of damage done to the place of worship are the determining factors in how you’re charged.

A guilty conviction of misdemeanor vandalism of a place of worship means a maximum sentence of twelve months in jail and a $1,000 fine. The maximum sentence for a felony PC 594.3 conviction is three years in prison and a $10,000 fine. In both misdemeanor and felony cases, the judge will likely order you to make restitution which means you’ll have to reimburse the religious organization for the damage you’ve done.

Vandalizing a place of worship already has severe consequences but things go from bad to worse if the court decides that the act of vandalism was also a hate crime. If you’re convicted of a hate crime the maximum sentence for vandalizing a place of worship includes longer periods of imprisonment, larger fines, and a great deal of public disdain.

The best way to avoid being potentially charged with vandalizing a place of worship in California is to make sure that you’re on your best behavior whenever you’re on or near a religious property.

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The Difference Between a State and Federal Warrant

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Kings County, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds, Los Angeles Bail Bonds

Most of us know that the police can’t simply walk into our homes and start searching it unless you’ve given them permission to do so, or if they’ve gone through the correct legal channels and acquired a warrant.

The same is true when it comes to arrests. While there are some exceptions, such as drunk driving, you usually can’t be arrested unless the police have an actual arrest warrant.

What you might not know is that there are both state/local arrest warrants and federal arrest warrants.

The biggest difference between a federal and state/local warrant is the law enforcement agency that is involved in your case.

If a federal warrant has been issued for your arrest, it means that you’re a suspect in a federal crime. To obtain a federal warrant, the agency working on the case must present a federal judge with sufficient evidence that you potentially committed the crime and that the crime is indeed a federal matter.

In some situations, trying to determine if a case is federal or state can be complicated. When this happens, a joint task force that consists of both federal agents and state officers is formed. The joint task force not only allows the different agencies to pool talent and resources but also makes it easier to obtain warrants.

How you should behave if there is a warrant for your arrest depends on how you learn about this information.

If you have heard (or suspect) that an arrest warrant has been issued, but the police haven’t actually knocked on your door, don’t even think about trying to run. Bolting will only make the situation worse.

The first thing you should do is contact a lawyer. Tell them what you know and ask for their advice. They will likely encourage you to turn yourself in. By contacting a lawyer before you’re formally arrested, you can keep them by your side throughout the entire process and make sure that none of your civil rights are violated.

Since the police aren’t currently hauling you to the police station, take a little time to get your personal affairs in order. This is a good time to contact a bail bonds agency and alert them that you’ll likely need a bail bond. If you have children or pets, take steps to make sure they’re properly cared for if you have to remain in jail for a few days. Lock up your home, and make your way to the police station.

If the police show up at your home with an arrest warrant, read the warrant and make sure all the information is accurate. If the information is accurate, calmly and quietly go with the officers. Don’t even think about trying to resist the arrest. Don’t answer any questions, take a plea deal, or discuss the case with anyone until your lawyer has arrived.

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California’s Search and Seizure Laws

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Kings County, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds, Los Angeles Bail Bonds

California lawmakers believe that the common citizen should be as protected from the police as possible. The creation of search and seizure laws is one of the steps lawmakers have taken to make sure that your Fourth Amendment rights are protected. Not only are the search and seizure laws designed to prevent the police from randomly searching an individual’s property, but they also make it impossible for any evidence obtained via an illegal search to be used in a criminal trial.

It doesn’t matter if you’re dealing with county police officers, California state troopers, or FBI agents, you’re still protected by California’s search and seizure laws. Because of these laws, you do not have to allow members of law enforcement to search your property unless they have a valid warrant that’s signed by a judge or if the search marks one of the few exceptions to the rules.

When Law Enforcement Doesn’t Need a Warrant

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California’s Famous Three Strikes Law

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Kings County, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds, Los Angeles Bail Bonds

California’s famous three strikes law was created in 1994 and received voter approval. The murder case of Polly Klaas and Kimber Reynolds was the catalyst for implementing the three-strikes law.

Kimber Reynold’s life was brutally ended in 1992 during an attempted mugging. One of the muggers pulled a gun, placed it against Kimber’s ear, and pulled the trigger before fleeing the scene. Kimber later passed away in the hospital.

A man by the name of Douglas Walker was arrested for his involvement in Kimber’s murder. Walker was able to avoid a life in prison sentence by striking a plea deal. It was quickly revealed that Walker had a history of committing violent felonies. Walker’s violent history prompted Kimber’s dad to start persuing and lobbying for the three-strike law.

In 1994, Polly Klaas was having a great time with friends at a slumber party when she was kidnapped. For two months, the police searched for answers. Polly’s body was eventually found in a shallow grave. She’d been strangled.

Richard Allen Davis was arrested and charged with both the kidnapping and the murder of Klaas. During his trial, it became obvious that Davis also had an extensive history of crime that included assault, attempted sexual assault and kidnapping, abduction, and armed robbery.

Kimber Reynold’s father includes Davis in his lobbying attempt for the three-strikes law. He quickly pointed out that had there been a three-strikes law in effect before the early 1990s, both Kimber and Polly would be alive.

When California’s residents voted on the three-strike law, they were told that if the law passed, it would keep murders, rapists, and others who had a history of violent felonies behind bars. While this has happened, it also turns out that many of the people who have had sentences impacted by the three-strike law aren’t guilty of violent crimes and are actually being forced to serve 25 years in prison for relatively minor offenses.

A common misconception people had with the three-strike law when it was originally enacted is that the person impacted by the law has been convicted of the same crime on three separate occasions but that’s not the case. In many situations, the individual has been convicted of three different crimes. An example of this would be someone who has a felony drug conviction, a felony grand theft conviction, and a felony bribery conviction.

In 2012 California residents decided that the three-strikes law had gone too far and they enacted the Three Strikes Reform Act (also called Proposition 36) which tweaked the original three-strikes act so that nonviolent felons didn’t have to spend the better part of their natural life behind bars.

When the Three-Strikes Reform Act was passed, more than 1,000 prisoners were released. The best news is that of these 1,000 freshly released prisoners, only two percent were later charged with a new felony crime.

The way that the three-strikes rule currently works is that anyone who is convicted for a grand total of three violent felonies sentence will be automatically extended. The extension is anywhere from 25 additional years to life in prison. It’s important to understand that the 25 years is added to the original sentence.

While most people are familiar with the three-strike rule, few realize that there is also a two-strike rule which automatically doubles the sentence of anyone who is convicted of a violent felony crime a second time.

The list of convictions impacted by the three strike law include:

  • Arson
  • Carjacking
  • Murder or voluntary manslaughter
  • Extortion
  • Rape
  • Kidnapping

There have been some cases of a person managing to avoid the three-strike law after their lawyer argued that one of the previous convictions didn’t actually count as a strike.

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Pickpocketing in California

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Kings County, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds, Los Angeles Bail Bonds

When you think about it, you don’t often hear about pickpocketers these days. It’s not because pickpocketing is no longer a problem, but because crimes involving pickpocketers are either given different names and because they seldom generate any media attention.

According to the CBS affiliate in San Francisco, pickpocketing is still a common occurrence. They reported that on Muni in San Francisco, the number of reported pickpocketing incidents increased by 8 percent in 2018.

Most pickpocketing incidents in California fall into the category of petty theft, which means that the thief’s adventures involved an amount that was less than $400. It’s actually in a pickpocket’s best interest to specifically target people who have less than $400 on them because if the thief is caught and eventually convicted the maximum sentence they ace is six months in a local jail and a fine that won’t exceed $1,000.

Depending on the pickpocket’s criminal history and the exact details surrounding the pickpocketing event, the judge could decide that a sentence of misdemeanor probation is sufficient.

On the other hand, if the pickpocket manages to lift more than $400 from a pocket and is eventually convicted of grand theft, the potential sentence is a maximum of three years in a state prison.

It is worth noting that if a pickpocket accidentally removes a gun rather than a wallet from its target’s pocket, it could be in more serious trouble than they anticipated. The involvement of the gun changes things. It doesn’t matter if the pickpocket knew about the gun or not, the fact that they attempted to steal it automatically means they will face a charge of grand theft in California.

Other factors that can quickly change things for a pickpocket is if they are armed when they picked a pocket if they got into a physical argument during the incident and if they made any verbal threats.

If a gun or knife was on the pickpocket’s person during the incident, the pickpocket will likely be charged with armed robbery. If blows/kicks/bites/etc were exchanged during the incident, assault charges will likely be filed against the pickpocket. If verbal threats were used during the incident, the pickpocket could face intimidation charges.

The best way to avoid pickpocketing charges and accusations is to keep to yourself whenever you find yourself in a crowded situation.