Monthly Archives

May 2020

Your Options for Paying

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia

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Your Options for Paying?

People like to have options, especially in instances where payment options tend to be a bit limited. This can be the case when you need to bail someone out of jail. We understand that leaving your loved one stuck in jail may not be an option for you, no matter how much it may cost. Luckily for you, Carl’s Bail Bonds In Los Angeles provides plenty of payment options for our clients.

For starters, our bail bonds only cost 10% of the full bail amount. If your loved one’s bail is set at $20,000, then the bail bond will cost $2,000. That’s a 90% discount right off the bat for just coming to us for help.

From there, we provide all of our clients with affordable, personalized payment plans. This breaks up the cost and provides our clients with some wiggle room. Now, instead of needing to make one giant payment, you will be able to make smaller, more manageable monthly payments. The best part is that your loved one gets released from jail after you make your first payment.

We know that everyone is a little different and that their situations can change from month to month. That is why we provide a variety of accepted payment options to make paying as easy as possible for you. We accept the following payment types:

  • Cash
  • Check
  • Credit/debit cards
  • E-checks
  • Wells Fargo business account deposit
  • Western Union money transfers
  • .

Depending on which method you choose, you can make the payments:

  • In-person
  • Online
  • Over the phone

You get to use whichever method works best for you that month.

During this difficult time, we at Carl’s Bail Bonds In Los Angeles try to do everything that we can to make posting bail easier for our clients. This is why we accept so many different types of payments and provide custom payment plans. If you need more help paying for the bail bond, ask one of our bail agents about the discounts we offer, that you may qualify for.

Do you want a free consultation with a professional bail agent? If so, call (866) 855-3186 or click Chat With Us now.

What Happens If a Person Misses a Bail Payment?

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia

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What Happens If a Person Misses a Bail Payment?

Most people have a lot of questions and concerns when it comes to dealing with bail. This is largely because most people don’t know a whole lot about bail in the first place. After all, they never expected to need bail. Still, that doesn’t mean that someone they know will never get arrested. In California alone, thousands of people are arrested every single day.

One of the big concerns that people have when dealing with bail, is what happens when they miss a payment or miss a court date? Everyone understands that missing either one of those would not be good, but they aren’t sure exactly how bad it is. Does it lead to harsh consequences, or does the person just receive a slap on the wrist?

There Is a Contract

When a person posts bail with a bail bond, they sign an agreement with the bail agent. By signing the contract, the person is promising to go to all of their court dates. They are also agreeing to pay off the money they owe for the bail bond. Breaking a contract does have repercussions.

Just like with any other contract, once a person has signed it, they are expected to keep to their word. This means that there can be very harsh consequences if a person misses a payment or a court date. However, before anyone starts to panic, things aren’t always horrible if a person truly misses a payment or court date.

Was It an Accident?

The consequences of missing either a payment or a court date are largely dependent on why they were missed. For instance, at Carl’s Bail Bonds In Los Angeles, if it was a genuine accident that led to something being missed, and the client responsibly contacts their bail agent as soon as they realize the mistake, then things don’t have to be so severe.

At Carl’s Bail Bonds In Los Angeles, we understand that life is messy and things that were once certain can become uncertain very quickly. Maybe something happened that made the once manageable payments difficult. When it comes to missed payments, we can work with clients to re-evaluate their payment plan.

If a person missed their court date because they were held up in traffic, or they forgot, they need to talk to their bail agent right away. When someone misses their court date, the court can consider the bail forfeit and the bail agent will begin trying to get into touch with the person. As long as the agent can get in touch with the person, they can help them set up a new court date.

Both of these outcomes are only available if the person talks with their bail agent immediately.

The Person Ran

If the person purposefully missed a payment or court date because they are running, then things will proceed differently. First, whenever something is missed, the bail agent will immediately begin trying to talk to their client. This includes trying all known phone numbers for the person, as well as contacting friends and family members to try and get the person’s whereabouts.

If agents cannot get a hold of the person, then the worst will be assumed and investigators will be called in to begin searching for the person. The investigators, sometimes referred to as bounty hunters, will track down the person and bring them into the proper authorities to be arrested. The chances of them being granted bail again will be a whole lot slimmer.

The expenses for tracking the person down will be charged to whoever ran. If they cannot pay it, then whoever signed for the bail bond will have to pay for those expenses.

Sometimes Things Happen

Missing a payment or a court date while out on bail can be a very big deal. The immediate thought is that the person ran away, however that isn’t always the case. More often than not it was a mistake or accident and the person is still trying to follow the rules.

If that is the case, Carl’s Bail Bonds In Los Angeles is more than willing to work with our clients. We know that sometimes things happen. As long as our clients talk with us, we will help them deal with their bail.

If people try to run from the court while out on bail, they can expect to be tracked down. Someone will find them and bring them back into custody. Running just delays the inevitable and makes the whole situation worse. Sooner or later, everyone gets caught and has to face what they did.

Do you want a free consultation with a professional bail agent? If so, call (866)855-3186 or click Chat With Us now.

Transporting Marijuana in California

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia

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Transporting Marijuana in California

Nearly four years ago, Californians voted to legalize the recreational use of marijuana in the state. That law went into effect in 2018 and as such, there is still some confusion about what is and isn’t legal when it comes to marijuana in the state of California. People are still unsure about what can and cannot get them into trouble when it comes to the drug.

While the drug is legalized for recreational use, it is heavily regulated. If a person doesn’t follow the rules and laws, then they can find themselves in some serious trouble even though they thought they were doing something legal. A big thing that people need to worry about when dealing with marijuana is transporting it.

Transporting and DUI

A big issue with transporting marijuana is the potential for DUI. A person is guilty of DUI if they drive a motor vehicle with drugs or alcohol in their system. This does include driving while high on marijuana.

As such, legal marijuana is subject to the same types of laws as alcohol. This means a driver cannot have an open container of marijuana in their vehicle. Marijuana also needs to be transported in the storage compartment of the vehicle, just like alcohol. Basically, if a person couldn’t expect to do something with alcohol in a vehicle, then they can’t do it with marijuana either.

A person caught driving high will face standard DUI charges.

Marijuana Possession and Transport Laws

When it comes to transporting the drug or someone keeping it on their person, they need to be careful. A person is only allowed to have so much marijuana in their possession at a time. If they have more than that legal amount, then they could face simple possession charges.

As far as California law is concerned, a person over the age of 21 can only have up to 28.5 grams of marijuana, or up to 4 grams of concentrated cannabis, on them at a time. A person having any more than that in their possession at one time is illegal here in California. Having possession of the substance doesn’t just include the person holding the item. It can also include:

  • Being in a person’s home
  • Being in a person’s car

The person doesn’t have to actively be holding something to have possession of it, they just need to have the marijuana in a place where they have control. Under this definition, a person can get into trouble with the law if they legally buy more than 28.5 grams of marijuana from a licensed dispensary.

The only time a person can carry or transport more than the personal legal limit is when they are intending to sell it. The only time a person can legally sell marijuana in the state of California is when they have a license to do so.

Penalties for Having Too Much Marijuana

When a person possesses more than the legal amount of marijuana, they can face possession charges under Health and Safety Code (HS) 11357. This law dictates how much marijuana a person can have in their possession at any given time and where they are allowed to have.

Breaking this law is typically a misdemeanor offense that comes with:

  • Up to 6 months in county jail
  • A max fine of $500

The charges are reduced to infractions if the person is under the age of 18.

Transporting marijuana with the intent to sell it without a license is illegal under HS 11360. The consequences for breaking this law are typically misdemeanor charges that come with:

  • Up to 6 months in county jail
  • A max fine of $1,000

The charges can be upped to felony charges if a person has certain prior convictions that include:

  • Certain serious violent felonies
  • More than 2 prior convictions of HS 11360
  • The defendant knowingly attempted to sell marijuana to a minor
  • Defendants who transported more than the personal legal limit of marijuana into California.

Transporting Marijuana across State Lines

As far as federal law is concerned, marijuana is still a schedule 1 hallucinogenic drug, making it very illegal. This means that even if a person follows all of the rules and regulations presented by the California government, they could still get into trouble at the federal level.

Transporting even legal amounts of marijuana can become a problem when a person tries to cross state lines or get onto a plane. As far as airports are concerned, once a person goes through TSA security checkpoints, they are on federal grounds. Federal law takes precedent over state law, which means a person can get into trouble for having any amount of marijuana on them. People should leave their marijuana at home if they plan on flying anywhere.

When crossing state borders, it is important to remember that not all states have legalized marijuana. Many still have the same rules and restrictions as set forth by the federal government. This means that getting caught bringing drugs into another state could have very disastrous consequences depending on the state.

Don’t Get Into Trouble with Marijuana

There is still a lot of confusion surrounding the recreational use of marijuana here in California. Part of this is due to the relative newness of the laws. Another part is due to the varying views on the drug across the country.

When looking at marijuana, a person is better off treating it the same way they would alcohol and cigarettes since it faces many of the same restrictions. It is also better to keep the marijuana here in California and not try to take it across state lines or into federally controlled areas, such as airports. As long as a person can do those things, they shouldn’t run into any trouble with the law.

Wrongfully Parking in a Handicapped Spot

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia

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Wrongfully Parking in a Handicapped Spot

Having a disability can make tasks that most people take for granted difficult to complete. To make things easier for people with disabilities, several laws and practices have been adopted here in California, and the rest of the nation at large. This includes things such as automatic doors, ramps instead of steps, and even specialized parking spots.

Disabled, or handicap, parking spots can be found in most parking lots. These spaces are often located close to the building or near an elevator. This is meant to help provide a person with a disability better access to their intended destination.

Since these spots are located in such desirable locations, or can regularly be found empty, some people decide to use them even though they are not disabled themselves. They don’t see it as a big deal, which is why they are often surprised by the consequences of wrongfully parking in a handicap spot.

Disabled Parking Spots

Disabled parking spots are easy to spot thanks to their blue paint and the symbol of a person in a wheelchair. In parking lots, the spaces will also have a section beside them that is marked off by diagonal white lines. These spots are not for parking but are intended to provide room for the disabled person to get in and out of their car.

Other places where vehicles with disabled passengers can park include:

  • Along blue curbs
  • Street-metered spaces free of charge
  • On public streets where parking is typically reserved for residents and business customers
  • Along green curbs without a time limit

To legally park in one of these spots, a person has to have a handicapped placard or license plate.

Misusing Handicapped Parking Spots

If a person doesn’t have a handicapped placard or license plate or misuses a handicapped placard, they can find themselves in trouble. For starters, if a person parks in a handicapped without a placard or license plate, then they can expect to have their vehicle towed and impounded.

Typically, when someone parks where they shouldn’t, officers will just stick a ticket to the windshield of the vehicle. However, since there are only a limited number of handicapped spots in an area, and they can be needed at any moment, officers will have offending vehicles towed to open up the spot. This means a person will then have to pay to get their vehicle out of impound, which can easily cost a few thousand dollars.

Misusing a disabled placard or license plate is illegal here in California under Vehicle Code (VC) 4461. Instances that count as misuse include:

  • Using disabled placards or plates
  • Using someone else’s placard
  • Using an invalid placard or plate

The only time a non-disabled person is allowed to use a disabled person’s placard or plates to park in a handicapped spot is when they are driving the disabled person somewhere. If a person is borrowing a handicapped driver’s car, they cannot park in a handicapped spot even though the car has valid plates. This is because the disabled person is not there with them. Handicapped placards and plates are only valid with the person they are assigned to.

Penalties for Wrongfully Parking in a Handicapped Spot

VC 4461 is a wobbler offense that can be charged as either an infraction or as a misdemeanor. How the offense is charged is dependent on the severity of the incident and the person’s record. For instance, if they have done this sort of thing multiple times in the past, they are more likely to be charged with a misdemeanor.

When charged as an infraction, a person will face a fine between $250 and $1,000 with no possibility of jail time.

When charged as a misdemeanor, a person will face:

  • Up to 6 months in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • Misdemeanor probation.

Regardless of how the offense is charged, the court can add a fine of $1,500. The local city can also add on a $100 fine.

If You Don’t Need the Spot, Park Somewhere Else

Sometimes it can be easy for people to forget how great they’ve got it. Sure everyone wants to park close to their destination, but that isn’t always possible. Most people are fortunate enough that they can walk a far distance. Some people aren’t so lucky.

Handicapped parking spots exist for an important reason: to make things easy for people with disabilities. When a person parks in these spots and doesn’t have a disability, they are preventing that spot from being used by someone who needs it. This is why it is illegal for a person to wrongfully park in a handicapped parking spot.

Is Blackmailing Illegal in California?

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia

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Is Blackmailing Illegal in California?

Blackmailing is never fun, especially when you are at the receiving end of it. The trope of someone finding some secret of another person and then using it to get the victim to do whatever they say shows up a lot in fiction. Unfortunately, it is present in the real world too.

Luckily, the act of blackmailing an individual is illegal here in California. Anyone who is caught blackmailing another individual to get what they want will face legal charges. For committing the act, a person will face harsh consequences.

What Is Extortion

The act of extortion, more commonly known as blackmail, is defined under Penal Code (PC) 518 as using force or threat to compel another individual to give money or property or to compel a public official to perform an official act. Some examples of extortion can include, but are not limited to:

  • Threatening to release compromising images of another individual unless they agree to pay a certain amount of money.
  • Threatening to harm a person’s loved ones unless they give them a certain item.
  • Threatening to expose a public official’s affair unless they support a certain project.
  • A public official threatening to permit a certain project unless a person pays them off.

The list could easily go on, but this provides an idea of what can count as extortion here in California. Any time a person:

  • Threatens to use force against another individual,
  • Threatened to accuse the other person of a crime,
  • Or, threatened to expose a secret,

And the victim then hands over or does whatever the person wanted, then the person is guilty of extortion.

If a person does the same thing but does so through a letter they can be guilty of extortion by threatening letter under PC 523. This is pretty much the same thing as regular extortion, except in this instance the victim does not have to hand over or do whatever they were extorted for in order for the person to be considered guilty.

PC 522 defines the crime of extortion of a signature, which is using extortion to get the victim to sign a document. Again, in this instance it doesn’t matter if the victim signed the document. All that matters is that the person tried to extort the signature.

Penalties for Extortion

Extortion is a very serious offense and as such, the crime is always charged as a felony. Under PC 518, the penalties for extortion can come with:

  • 2, 3, or 4 years in county jail.
  • A max fine of $10,000.
  • Felony probation.

If the victim of the extortion was a dependent or a senior, then the person can face even harsher consequences.

If the extortion was related to gang activity, it could count under California’s Three Strikes Law.

If someone attempted to commit extortion, but the victim didn’t give in to the demands, then the person can be charged with attempted extortion. This is a wobbler offense in California, meaning that it can either be charged as a misdemeanor or as a felony. As a misdemeanor, the crime comes with:

  • Up to 1 year in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • Misdemeanor probation.

As a felony, attempted extortion comes with:

  • 16 months, 2 years, or 3 years in county jail.
  • A max fine of $10,000.
  • Felony probation.

No One Wants to Be Blackmailed

Being blackmailed is not something that anyone wants to have to deal with. It can create a lot of stress and worry for the victim. Plus, when it involves public officials, it can affect a whole lot of people. This is why extortion is illegal and comes with very serious felony charges. Anyone caught blackmailing a person, or even attempting to blackmail someone, will likely find themselves locked behind bars for several years.

Can Minors Be Bailed Out of Jail?

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds

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Can Minors Be Bailed Out of Jail?

Bail is a confusing and unknown subject to a lot of people out there. Most people don’t think about one of their friends or family members getting arrested, so they don’t even consider how they would bail that person out. In most instances, this is just for adults. Many parents may not even consider the possibility of their child being arrested.

Unfortunately, sometimes kids do push the boundaries of the law too far and wind up in big trouble. This is when parents begin to freak out. What are they going to do? How do they help their child? No one wants someone that they care about to be stuck behind bars, and this is especially true when that someone is a child. However, can minors even be bailed out?

The Juvenile Court System

When minors get into trouble with the law, they do not face the same system that adults do. Instead of being booked into the system and placed into jail, more often than not minors are released back to the custody of their parents. As far as the state of California is concerned, the parents are the best authorities when it comes to punishing their children.

When a minor is arrested, they will have a court experience that is different than what adults face. There will be four different hearings that they will have to attend. Those hearings will be:

  • Detention hearing: Here the judge will determine if the minor will be held in custody or be released to his or her parents. In California, this must occur within 48 hours of the initial arrest to inform the minor why they were arrested.
  • Fitness Hearing: This will be used to determine if the case will be heard in juvenile court or an adult court. This is usually skipped in most cases as the accused crime was not severe enough to warrant this question to be asked.
  • Adjudication Hearing: This is the ‘trial’ portion of the case. It is held before a juvenile court judge.
  • Disposition Hearing: This is where the judge reveals his or her verdict on the case and the sentence if found guilty.

During the entirety of the trial process, minors are not bailable.

If a minor is found guilty of their accused crime, they will face consequences. However, these consequences will be different than what an adult would face. The main goal of penalties for minors is to prevent them from wanting to break the law again in the future.

Some of the common penalties that minors receive in California include:

  • Following a curfew
  • Going to counseling
  • Going to school
  • Paying restitution to the victim
  • Performing community service

Instead of being sent to jail, minors will be sent to places like:

  • A probation camp
  • A foster or group home
  • The California Division of Juvenile Justice
  • Juvenile Hall

After sentencing, juveniles must follow through their entire sentence, even if they turn 18.

When Are Minors Tried as Adults?

If a minor over the age of 14 is accused of certain, serious crimes, then they can be tried as an adult. Some examples of these severe crimes include, but are not limited to:

  • Rape
  • First-degree murder
  • Forcible sex offenses

Other times when minors can be tried as adults include when the minor is 16 or older and has a history of being a delinquent or exhibited a high degree of criminal sophistication.

If a minor is tried as an adult, then they will have a trial by jury and will be eligible for bail, if the crime allows for it.

Minors Cannot Be Bailed Out.

Minors can’t be bailed out of jail, and the reason is that they aren’t usually held in jail since the preferred option is to leave the child under the supervision of their parents. Even if the minor is taken into custody, they aren’t sent to jail. While Juvenile Hall is often viewed as a jail for kids, it is nowhere near as bad as actual jail. Take into account that trials for minors are conducted faster than adult trials, which means minors held in custody won’t be held for long.

Life After Posting Bail

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds

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Life After Posting Bail

When it comes to bail, people have a lot of questions. This is understandable since most people never expected that they would need to bail someone out of jail. Luckily the people here at Carls Bail Bonds in Tulare are here to help. We know everything about bail and will be more than happy to answer your questions on the subject.

One common question that we receive is: what are people allowed to do while out on bail? This is only natural since people want to know what they can and cannot do to avoid getting into more trouble. After all, the last thing anyone who was just bailed out wants is to be arrested once again.

Be on Your Best Behavior

When a person is released from jail, it is easy to understand that they are walking on thin ice. After all, they were just arrested. Being out of jail doesn’t mean they are out of trouble. They need to be on their best behavior or they risk being arrested once again and being in worse trouble.

So, what does a person have to do to stay out of that extra trouble?

First and foremost, a person needs to be on their best behavior while out on bail. They should not do anything that can get them into trouble with the law. Some obvious example of activities that a person shouldn’t do while out on bail includes:

  • Trespassing.
  • Disturbing the peace.
  • Shoplifting.
  • Drug possession.

Crimes like these may seem minor, but at a time when a person is meant to be showing how trustworthy and responsible they are, getting into any sort of legal trouble is a bad sign. It can cause the court, the person’s bail agent, and even the person’s loved ones to lose faith in the individual. If the person causes too much trouble, they could be re-arrested and chances are they won’t be granted bail again.

Can You Travel?

Each case is different from the other, and so the kind of restrictions one person may face will be different from the restrictions another person faces. When it comes to traveling while out on bail, it is best to limit those trips.

It is not uncommon for people who are out on bail to be faced with travel restrictions. The extent of the restrictions are dependent on the facts of the case. Some people may be limited to going from home to work and back. Others may be restricted to just their city, or maybe county. In most cases, people are prohibited from leaving the country.

If a person isn’t facing any travel restrictions and can go on trips, they need to ensure that none of their travels interfere with their court dates. A person’s trial needs to be their top priority and they should never take a trip over going to court. if they miss a date, then they could wind up back in jail.

Don’t Get Re-Arrested

When a person is out on bail, for the most part, they get to return to living their normal life. They can work and hang out with friends and family members. Being out on bail can make the whole trial process a lot easier for a person to endure. It even allows them to earn money and pay for their bail.

However, it is important to remember that being out on bail isn’t full freedom. Yes, the person is out of jail, but they are still on trial for whatever they were arrested for in the first place. Doing anything that could jeopardize that trial, or the loose freedom they have while out on bail is a very bad idea.

What Are Protesters’ Rights?

By | Carls Bail Bonds

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What Are Protesters’ Rights?

One of the great things about living here in the United States is that people can always speak their mind. The First Amendment to the Constitution grants every US citizen the right to freedom of speech and peacefully protest. This way, if someone doesn’t like something that is going on in the world, they can speak out against it and try to make a change.

While this law is a great one, there is often a bit of confusion around it. Sometimes people find themselves being arrested for what they believe to have been them exercising their First Amendment Rights. This is especially common during protests. The problem is that some people don’t understand what is and isn’t protected, and so they may overstep and do something they think is protected when, in fact, it is considered illegal.

The First Amendment to the Constitution

The US Constitution is what gives us citizens our many rights. The First Amendment to the Constitution grants citizens freedom of speech, freedom of the press, the freedom of religion, and the right to assemble/petition. This is the amendment that gives people the right to protest when they are upset about something.

The Amendment was a part of the Bill of Rights, which is the first 10 amendments to the Constitution. It was adopted into law in 1791 to protect the civil liberties of US citizens.

Where People Run Into Trouble

The problem that most people run into while protesting is that they start to break laws even though they think they are just exercising their right to free speech.

True, everyone has the right to free speech. However, no one is allowed to threaten the safety of others or to lie or slander other people. Threatening to hurt or kill people is never acceptable and is not protected under the First Amendment. Doing this will get a person arrested, and rightfully so. No one should ever be made to feel like their life is in danger. A protester is also not allowed to say things that could start a riot or other dangerous behavior.

People are allowed to gather and protest, as long as they do so safely and in designated public areas. Some acceptable places to protest include parks, sidewalks, public streets, public auditoriums, the steps of city hall, in front of government buildings, and on private property with the property owner’s permission. A person can protest in any of these locations without fear of arrest, so long as they are not exhibiting any unsafe behavior, such as blocking traffic.

Protesters still have to listen to orders given by peace officers whose jobs it is to protect people’s safety. Police officers are meant to keep people safe. If they are telling someone to stop acting in a dangerous manner, which can include disrupting traffic, disturbing the peace, or risking public health, the person needs to listen or they will be arrested.

A protester is allowed to peacefully express their opinions as long as they continue to follow other established laws. If they don’t do that, then they could be arrested for breaking those laws.

Laws Protesters Can Be Charged with in California

A person can get arrested while protesting if they start breaking laws. Some of the laws that are most commonly broken by protesters include:

  • Penal Code (PC) 148: Resisting arrest. A person breaks this law when they resist arrest or obstruct an officer from arresting someone else.
  • PC 403: Disturbing a public meeting. A person breaks this law when they willfully disturb or break up a lawful public meeting.
  • PC 409: Failing to disperse. A person breaks this law when they stay at a riot or other unlawful assembly after being told to leave by a police officer.
  • PC 415: Disturbing the peace. A person breaks this law when they play excessively loud music, start a fight with someone, or use offensive language meant to start a fight.
  • PC 602: Trespassing. A person breaks this law when they enter or remain on private property when they don’t have permission to be there.

Everyone Has Rights

Here in the US, if a person doesn’t like something, they have the right to say so. They have the right to try and peacefully convince others of their idea. However, they do not have the right to do whatever they want while protesting.

While a person is protesting, they must remember other peoples’ rights as well. People have the right to go about their daily lives peacefully, they have the right to not be threatened with violence, and everyone has the right to speak their mind, even if their opinion is different.

Don’t Stress About Collateral

By | Bail Bond in Fresno, Bail Bonds in Bakersfield, Bail Bonds in Los Angeles, Bail Bonds in Tulare, Bail Bonds In Visalia, Carls Bail Bonds

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Don’t Stress About Collateral

When someone is taking out a loan, there is a more than likely chance that the lender will want something as collateral. That way, if the person doesn’t pay back the money, the lender can get their money back. In this sense, it is easy to see why companies like to use collateral. The problem is that collateral isn’t so great for clients.

Paying back a loan is already stressful enough on its own. Having collateral held over your head only adds to that stress. Now you have to worry about making payments on time and worry about losing whatever was pledged as collateral.

Here at Carls Bail Bonds in Tulare, we want to make posting bail as stress-free as possible. We understand that requiring collateral on a bail bond can cause more stress, which is why we tend to avoid it. Most of our bail bonds don’t need collateral as long as one of the co-signers is working.

With the signature of a working co-signer, you won’t have to worry about dealing with collateral in most cases. This allows you to focus solely on helping out your loved one without risking a car or your home to do so.

Some of the other benefits that we provide for our clients include:

  • 24/7 Bail bond service
  • 20% Discount
  • Phone approvals
  • 0% Interest payment plans
  • No hidden fees
  • Se habla Español

Bailing someone out of jail can be stressful enough, you shouldn’t have to worry about pledging something as collateral. That is why you should contact Carls Bail Bonds in Tulare. We do not require collateral on most of our bail bonds. Save yourself the headache and worry by talking to one of our bail agents today.

Do you want a free consultation with a professional bail agent? If so, call (866) 855-3186 or click Chat With Us now.