Monthly Archives

December 2019

Are New Year’s Eve Fireworks Legal in California?

Are New Year’s Eve Fireworks Legal in California?

By | Carls Bail Bonds

Are New Year’s Eve Fireworks Legal in California?

The end of the year is rapidly approaching and everyone is getting ready. One of the big, spectacular ways that people celebrate the end of the year and the arrival of the next one is with fireworks displays. With today’s technology, a person can watch displays from all over the world.

For some people, seeing fireworks displays on television is good enough. However, there are people out there who would rather set off fireworks on their own. Unfortunately doing that sort of thing here in California is usually illegal for everyday people. In addition, there are other forms of celebration that can get a person into trouble.

Fireworks and New Year’s Eve

Here in California, there are very strict laws regarding fireworks. Fireworks are divided into two categories: dangerous, and safe and sane. Dangerous fireworks can only be purchased and set off by licensed professionals for specific shows. Safe and sane fireworks can be purchased by regular people and set off with care. However, safe and sane fireworks can only be sold in the state between June 28th and July 6th. This makes it a bit hard for someone who wants to get fireworks for New Year’s Eve celebrations.

On top of that, fireworks are usually forbidden in most areas. State law prohibits fireworks from being set off in areas where they are likely to hurt someone, or within 100 feet of a gas station. In addition, most counties add further restrictions about what kind of fireworks can be set off in what areas. For instance, many counties, such as LA County, prohibit fireworks from being set off in unincorporated areas. This is largely due to the high fire risk that fireworks present.

Most violations for fireworks result in misdemeanor charges for the person. This means that they face:

  • Up to 1 year in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.

However, in some instances, a person will face felony charges which come with:

  • Up to 3 years in state prison.
  • A max fine of $50,000.

Firing into the Sky

Another type of celebration that is definitely illegal is celebratory gunfire. California Penal Code (PC) 246.3 makes it a crime to negligently fire a firearm. This means that a person cannot willfully fire a gun in a grossly negligent manner that could result in someone’s injury or death. A perfect example of this is firing a gun into the air in celebration.

The laws of physics state that whatever goes up, must come down, and this holds true for bullets. Bullets fired into the air can come back down with deadly force. If they were to hit someone, they could severely hurt or kill someone.

This law is a wobbler offense here in California, which means it can either be charged as a misdemeanor or a felony. How it is charged depends on the facts of the case and the person’s criminal record. As a misdemeanor, a person faces:

  • Up to 1 year in jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • Summary probation.

As a felony, a person faces:

  • 16 months, 2 years, or 3 years in county jail.
  • A max fine of $10,000.
  • Formal probation.

Have a Safe and Fun New Year’s Eve

Celebrating New Year’s Eve is supposed to be fun. No one wants the fun to be ruined because someone got hurt or got arrested. That is exactly what can happen if someone sets off a firework or fires a gun into the sky. Something can very easily go wrong and someone can wind up getting severely hurt.

This is why the state has enacted laws against this kind of behavior. California doesn’t want just anyone setting off fireworks that could hurt someone or start a wildfire. The state also doesn’t want anyone recklessly firing a gun off whenever they want. If a person is caught doing either of these things, even in celebration of the new year, they will face legal consequences.

Don’t Get a DUI on New Year’s Eve

Don’t Get a DUI on New Year’s Eve

By | Carls Bail Bonds

Don’t Get a DUI on New Year’s Eve

As this year draws to a close, pretty much everyone is planning out how they are going to celebrate. Parties will be happening all over the world and deciding which party to go to can be a daunting task. Luckily, the end results are pretty fun, provided a person doesn’t make any bad decisions.

As an adult, most parties that people go to have alcohol at them. This isn’t usually a problem, as long as everyone drinks responsibly. A person should know their limits with alcohol and they should have a safe ride home.

No one should ever drive themselves after consuming alcohol. Being drunk while driving is a great way to cause an accident. On top of that, it is a surefire way to get a ticket and even get arrested. So while enjoying the New Year’s Eve celebrations, people need to be responsible or they will face some harsh consequences.

California DUI Laws

Here in the state of California, just like everywhere else in the country, it is illegal for a person to drive drunk. Under Vehicle Code (VC) 23152a, driving under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol is illegal. A person is driving under the influence any time they consume enough alcohol that their abilities are impaired enough that they can no longer operate the vehicle with the care and caution of a sober person.

VC 23152b makes it illegal for a person to drive a vehicle if their blood alcohol concentration (BAC) is above 0.08%.

VC 23153 makes it a crime for a person to drive under the influence and hurt someone. Basically, if someone ever commits DUI and seriously injures someone in the process, they will be charged with this crime.

DUI Checkpoints and Holidays

Something else to consider when planning holiday parties are DUI checkpoints. Whenever holidays roll around that tend to involve a lot of drinking, such as New Year’s Eve, law enforcement agencies tend to setup DUI checkpoints in heavily trafficked areas. These checkpoints are setup in the hopes to catch drunk drivers before they are able to cause an accident and hurt/kill someone.

DUI checkpoint locations will always be posted in advanced to give people the ability to avoid them if they choose to. If a person comes across a checkpoint, they will likely have to wait in line until an officer is available to talk to them. The officer will ask a few simple questions and if everything checks out, they will allow the driver to continue on their way.

However, if the officer suspects that the driver has been drinking, then they will ask the car to pull off to the side. From there, another officer will conduct a field sobriety test to confirm whether or not the driver has been drinking. If the driver is confirmed to have been drinking, he or she will be ticketed, and either have to get a ride home or be taken into custody.

Penalties for DUI

There are a lot of specific incidents when it comes to DUI. The consequences of DUI depend on which particular incident occurred. For a first time offense, a person faces misdemeanor charges that come with:

  • Up to 6 months in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • A 4 month driver’s license suspension.
  • Up to 9 months of DUI school.

The consequences for basic DUI increase with each offense.

If a person commits DUI and hurts someone, they will typically face misdemeanor charges that come with:

  • Up to 1 year in county jail.
  • A Max fine of $5,000.
  • A 1 year driver’s license suspension.
  • Up to 30 months of DUI school.
  • Paying restitutions to the victim.

If a person commits too many DUI’s within a set time period, or they kill someone because of DUI, they will automatically face felony charges. Felony DUI charges come with:

  • 16 months, 2 years, or 3 years in state prison.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • A 5 year driver’s license suspension.
  • Up to 30 months of DUI school.
  • These charges may seem light, but if a death was involved, they are often charged with vehicular manslaughter charges, which carry harsher consequences.

    End the Year on a High Note

    As the end of the year draws closer, everyone is planning out how to celebrate it. No matter what a person decides with the celebrations, if a person plans on drinking on New Year’s Eve, they need to do so responsibly. This means knowing their limits and having a plan to get home that doesn’t involve driving themselves.

    In today’s modern world, getting a safe ride home is a piece of cake thanks to apps like Uber and Lyft. Plus, there are always the traditional methods such as hiring a taxi or just designating a friend as a sober driver.

    No matter what you end up doing this New Year’s Eve, be sure to send 2019 off on a high note, which means not getting a ticket for DUI or causing an accident.

    What Happens If You Miss a Bail Bond Payment?

    What Happens If You Miss a Bail Bond Payment?

    By | Carls Bail Bonds

    What Happens If You Miss a Bail Bond Payment?

    A concern that many people have when dealing with bail is being able to make the payments. Here at Carls Bail Bonds, we break up the cost of our bonds by providing personalized payment plans for all of our clients. This makes bailing a loved one out of jail a whole lot easier for our clients.

    While the payments are designed to fit within each client’s unique budget, it isn’t always perfect. Sometimes life gets in the way and changes things up. What may have started off as an affordably sized monthly payment can suddenly become unbearable. This can happen for any number of reasons and can cause additional stress for clients.

    Luckily, here at Carls Bail Bonds we understand how things can change from month to month. Sometimes something like an emergency happens that makes someone spend more money than they were planning to. This, in turn, can make paying a payment more difficult for a month or two.

    If a client is aware of the fact that they are going to miss a payment beforehand, then they should talk to their bail agent. We are more than happy to work with clients when they need help. If a payment is missed without warning, contact your bail agent right away. If you don’t do that, your loved one could be taken back into custody.

    Here at Carls Bail Bonds, we do everything that we can to help out our clients. Some of the other services we provide include:

    • 24/7 Bail bond service
    • 20% Discount
    • Phone approvals
    • 0% Interest payment plans
    • No hidden fees
    • No collateral with working signer
    • Se habla Español

    At Carls Bail Bonds, we try our very best to make posting bail easier, this includes providing personalized payment plans. However, if there is ever a time that the payment seems too big, talk to one of our bail agents right away. They will be more than happy to help you.

    You can talk to a bail agent at any time by calling (866) 855-3186 or click Chat With Us now.

    Why Was Your Loved One Arrested?

    Why Was Your Loved One Arrested?

    By | Carls Bail Bonds

    Why Was Your Loved One Arrested?

    You never know what a friend or family member could get arrested for. After all, you never really expected a loved one to get arrested at all. Once you learn of a loved one’s arrest, you may not actually know why he or she was arrested. Trying to find that information on your own can be difficult, especially when your loved one can only talk to you for so long.

    Luckily, there are professionals who can help you. All you have to do is contact Carls Bail Bonds in Los Angeles. For over 30 years, we have helped Californians deal with bail and rescue their loved ones from jail. We can do the same for you. We provide all kinds of services for our clients, including:

    • 24/7 Bail bond service
    • 20% Discount
    • Phone approvals
    • 0% Interest payment plans
    • No hidden fees
    • No collateral with working signer
    • Se habla Español

    Once we locate your loved one in the county jail system, which we can do with just their name, birthday, and county of arrest, we can answer all of your questions. We can even tell you why your loved one was arrested in the first place. Once you are satisfied and all of your questions have been answered, then we can begin readying the bail bond.

    Our expert bail agents have plenty of experience with bail, and so they can guide you through the whole process. With our bail agents helping you, your loved one can be out of jail in as little as 2 hours in some counties. Regardless of how long it takes, our agents will work nonstop to get your loved one out of jail.

    No matter how surprising the arrest of a loved one can be for you, there is no reason to panic. Carls Bail Bonds in Los Angeles has plenty of experience helping people rescue their loved ones from jail. You can count on us to be there for you and to answer any questions that you might have about your loved one’s arrest.

    Want to talk to a bail agent for free? Just call (866) 855-3186 or click Chat With Us now.

    How to Avoid Road Rage

    How to Avoid Road Rage

    By | Carls Bail Bonds

    How to Avoid Road Rage

    The holidays are such a fun time of the year. They are a chance to get together with friends and family members who have been dearly missed for the last year. With everyone wanting to visit someone, a whole lot of travel is involved with the holiday season. Unfortunately, that fact, combined with the cold and stormy weather, can cause quite a bit of travel trouble.

    When the roads get packed with people, tensions can run high. Road rage becomes a very real possibility in what is supposed to be a fun and relaxing time. No one wants to deal with road rage on an average day, let alone around the holidays.

    Tips for Avoiding Road Rage

    In order to help everyone have a happy holiday season while driving around, here are some tips on how to best avoid road rage.

    • Be courteous when driving. Use turn signals and always check blind spots before merging. Doing this can very easily prevent an accident, or an almost accident, which will help everyone remain calm.
    • Don’t drive while upset. Studies have shown that the people most likely to suffer from road rage are those who are already emotionally unstable before they get behind the wheel. If a person was just in a bad fight or breakup, then they shouldn’t drive.
    • Don’t give obscene gestures. Spreading anger around, by doing things such as flipping people off, only makes other drivers angry, which makes the whole situation worse for everyone.
    • Don’t go home if followed. If an aggressive driver is following someone, that person should not go home and instead head to the nearest law enforcement station and call the authorities to alert them to the situation.
    • Don’t rush yourself. When it comes to driving, there are many things a driver can’t control, such as accidents and rush hour. Instead of trying to rush to get to somewhere on time, a driver sometimes needs to accept the fact that they are going to be late due to forces beyond their control.
    • Don’t try to teach a lesson. Don’t speed up to block aggressive drivers from merging since doing that can make things worse. Instead, leave plenty of room for the driver to merge and move on. Take the high road, so to speak.
    • Everyone makes mistakes. For the time being, every driver out there is human. This means that every driver, including yourself, is bound to make a mistake or two. Don’t hold it against them.
    • Give yourself extra time. If a driver knows they are going to encounter traffic, they should leave for their destination earlier than they normally would to give themselves plenty of time.
    • Listen to calm music. Doing this simple task has been shown to help calm drivers down, reducing their chances of succumbing to road rage.
    • Never engage aggressive drivers. If an angry driver gets out of their car to talk to someone else, the other driver should not get out of their own vehicle. Aggressive drivers can be unpredictable due to their rage and may try to hurt other drivers. Instead, call the police for assistance.
    • Only use horns for defensive driving. An example of this would be when a driver is merging but hasn’t noticed your car being in the way.
    • Report aggressive drivers. If a driver is driving recklessly and angrily, report them to the proper authorities. Doing so could prevent them from causing an accident or hurting someone.

    Getting Arrested for Road Rage

    While road rage itself is not a crime, there are four different crimes that a person can end up committing if they give in to road rage here in California. These four crimes are:

    • Assault with a deadly weapon. This is the same as assault, except a deadly weapon is involved, and guess what, a car can count as a deadly weapon. This means that threatening to run someone over is a crime. This can be either a misdemeanor or felony offense. As a felony it comes with up to 4 years in state prison.
    • Assault. This occurs when someone threatens to harm another individual and the other person believes that threat. This is a misdemeanor offense that comes with up to 6 months in jail and a max fine of $1,000.
    • Battery. Battery occurs when someone actually attacks another individual. This crime starts as a misdemeanor that comes with up to 6 months in jail and a max fine of $2,000. However, if someone is seriously injured, there will be harsher consequences.
    • Reckless driving. Driving without regard for safety is a crime that often results in misdemeanor charges that come with a 90 day jail stay and a max fine of $1,000. If someone is hurt due to the reckless driving, the consequences get even worse.
    • Drive Safely This Holiday Seaso

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      The holiday season is supposed to be fun and relaxing, unfortunately there is a whole lot of traffic to wade through. As frustrating as traffic can be, it should be expected around this time of year. This means drivers should prepare to deal with traffic so they are less likely to give in to road rage.

      A great way to do that is by following the tips above. Doing that can also help keep a driver from getting into trouble with the law around the holidays. Nobody wants that.

      Do you have any tips for dealing with road rage that you think might help others? If so, share them in the comments down below!

    Is It Legal to Leave a Pet Alone in a Cold Car?

    Is It Legal to Leave a Pet Alone in a Cold Car?

    By | Carls Bail Bonds

    Is It Legal to Leave a Pet Alone in a Cold Car?

    Every time summer rolls around, you begin to see articles all over about the dangers of leaving pets and children unattended in vehicles. In the hot weather, the temperatures inside a vehicle can quickly become unbearable and even deadly. Some people still fail to recognize this fact.

    On the other side of the coin, is the act of leaving pets alone in cars in cold weather. Being exposed to cold temperatures can be just as dangerous and deadly as being exposed to hot temperatures. This is why experts warn against leaving animals unattended in cars in cold weather too.

    Cold Weather Is Dangerous Too

    In hot weather, the inside temperatures in a car can drastically increase to dangerous levels. However, unlike with hot weather, cold temperatures inside a car cannot drastically decrease. Still this doesn’t mean they can’t be dangerous. In cold weather, car temperatures will simply lower until they match outside temperatures, which can be below freezing. It is these kinds of conditions that pet owners need to consider.

    On cold days, there can be different factors that play into how warm or cold the interior of a car can become. If the weather is cold, but the sun is out, the interior temperatures can be comfortable. In some cases, they could even become dangerous for animals. However, if the weather is overcast and it is raining or snowing, then the interior of the car will likely become too cold for anyone, even pets.

    Another aspect to consider is that even though most pets have fur, this does not make it impossible for them to get cold. Fur is essentially a permanent jacket that animals have to wear. It makes them more resistant to the cold, but it does eventually get too cold for them just like how even with a jacket, cold weather can become too much to deal with for people.

    On top of this is the fact that not all fur is the same. Some fur is better suited for cold weather, like the fur on huskies. Meanwhile, other breeds of dogs like Chihuahuas are more suited for warmer environments.

    Essentially, a pet owner needs to be aware of both the weather outside and what their pet can handle. If they don’t, they could end up risking their pet’s health and safety. Here in California, that can get a person into some trouble.

    Penal Code 597.7

    Here in California, Penal Code (PC) 597.7 makes it a crime for a person to leave an animal unattended in a vehicle if doing so threatens the health or safety of the animal. While this law is primarily concerned with leaving animals in hot cars, it also applies to animals left in cold cars as well. This is due to the fact that it refers to leaving animals in conditions that could cause harm.

    If a person is convicted of this crime, they will face the following depending on the circumstances. If it is a first time offense and no animal suffered any great bodily injuries, then the person faces a fine of $100 per animal. If an animal did suffer a great bodily injury, then the person faces a fine up to $500 and a jail sentence of 6 months.

    Any subsequent offenses of this crime results in a $500 fine and a 6 month jail stay regardless of whether or not any animals suffered any great bodily injuries.

    In addition, a person needs to consider that here in California, law enforcement officers who see an animal suffering in a vehicle are allowed to do whatever they need to in order to rescue the animal. This means that on top of the fines and jail time, the person could be looking at some repair bills as well.

    Leave the Critter at Home

    Most pet owners adore and cherish their furry companions. That is why they are often brought everywhere. Unfortunately, leaving pets alone in cars isn’t always safe. Pet owners need to be aware of the weather, whether it is too hot or too cold, before leaving a pet alone. As much as the animal may be loved, sometimes it is best for it to be left at home in a more climate controlled environment.

    What do you think of California’s law on leaving pets unattended in cars? Did you realize that it applied to both hot and cold conditions? Let us know what you think in the comments down below.

    Apple Beware of Porch Pirates and Package TheftBail Bonds

    Beware of Porch Pirates and Package Theft

    By | Carls Bail Bonds

    Apple Beware of Porch Pirates and Package TheftBail Bonds

    One of the nicest benefits of living in today’s modern world is that pretty much anything can be ordered online and delivered to a person’s home. This allows people to buy things they want or need without ever having to leave the house. This ability is very useful. However, as with all good things, there are those people out there that have to ruin it for everybody.

    There are always people looking to make a quick and easy buck, and that is exactly what porch pirates are. They take advantage of people’s orders being left out in the open and claim them for themselves. This problem only becomes more prominent as the holiday season draws nearer and people begin ordering more things online.

    What Are Porch Pirates?

    Porch pirate is a name for anyone who steals a delivered package from somebody’s front porch or yard. More often than not, these kind of thefts are crimes of opportunity. The person just happened to be walking, or even driving, by and they saw the package, or letter then decide in a moment to take it. They have no idea what could be inside, but they want it for themselves.

    Of course, there are some people who have turned this kind of behavior into their day job. They will spend their days scouring through neighborhoods looking for unattended packages that are just waiting to be taken. They steal the packages and either keep the contents for themselves or sell them to someone else to make a profit.

    Either way, one can easily see why this crime can be so distressing and upsetting for the victim, especially around Christmas time when the package could have been a gift for someone else.

    Tips to Avoid Porch Pirates

    Everyone wants to avoid falling victim to a porch pirate, especially during the holiday season. Luckily, there are a few different ways to reduce the chances of having a package stolen.

    • Amazon now has a service that allows for delivery inside a home. A person just unlocks their front door with an app on their phone so the delivery person can put the package in a safe place. They also have a similar thing for delivering inside a person’s car.
    • Have a trusted friend, neighbor, or family member who is home during the day get the package off the porch while at work.
    • Have packages delivered to work. If your workplace allows this, your packages will be delivered and watched over until you can pick it up.
    • Make sure someone will be home to answer the door and receive the package. By getting it off the porch, it is far less likely to be stolen.
    • Require a signature for the delivery. This ensures that the package isn’t left alone.
    • Set up a security camera aimed at the porch to help deter thefts in the first place. If a theft does occur, their will at least be video evidence of the culprit and their illegal act.
    • Some delivery companies, such as UPS, allow for customers to leave delivery instructions, such as hiding the package in a shed, instead of leaving it on a front porch.
    • The USPS provides a service called USPS Package Intercept that allows customers to change delivery destinations before the package has been sent out for final delivery.
    • UPS has a service called UPS My Choice that alerts a customer to a delivery the day before and allows them to change the time or location of the delivery for a small fee.
    • UPS, FedEx, and Amazon offer services where packages can be delivered to secure locations such as an office, warehouse, or locker. This way the package is safe until the customer comes to pick it up.

    Penalties for Mail Theft

    Stealing another person’s mail is illegal under both federal and state law. United States Code (USC) 1708 defines how mail can be stolen, and then lists how states should punish offenders of this crime. In a very long and descriptive way, the law basically states that anyone who knowingly takes someone else’s mail without permission to do so is guilty of mail theft. This law also defines what counts as mail, and includes the following items:

    • Letters.
    • Postcards.
    • Packages.
    • Mail bags.

    Here in California, mail theft is a misdemeanor offense under Penal Code (PC) 530.5e. This law makes it so that people who steal mail, such as porch pirates, face the following:

    • Up to 1 year in jail.
    • A max fine of $1,000.

    This law also makes it so that people can be charged with other laws on top of this one. This means that a person accused of breaking this law could actually face harsher consequences as well.

    Don’t Get Pirated This Holiday Season

    The holiday season is all about giving, but porch pirates out there are only concerned with taking. Don’t fall victim to them. Follow the tips above to help prevent a porch pirate from walking off with a loved one’s Christmas gift this holiday season.

    Have you ever been victimized by a porch pirate? Do you have any tips to avoid porch pirates that aren’t listed above? If so, add them in the comments down below. What about California’s take on mail theft? Are the consequences harsh enough, or does there need to be more of a deterrent against porch piracy? Let us know what you think in the comments down below.

    Carls Bail Bonds

    Can Minors Have Alcohol in California?

    By | Carls Bail Bonds

    Carls Bail Bonds

    There are certain laws that everyone knows about, such as don’t drive over the speed limit, don’t steal things from other people, and anyone under 21 is not allowed to drink alcohol. However, while these laws are well known, a lot of people tend to ignore them, which is never a good idea.

    Ignoring a law is a good way to get into trouble. One slip up could cause a person to be arrested or forced to pay a fine. This is especially true when it comes to laws surrounding minors and alcohol. Breaking a law is bad enough as an adult, abut as a minor it can lead to problems down the line.

    Minors and Alcohol Laws in California

    Here in the state of California, it is illegal for minors to consume alcohol under Business and Professions Code (BPC) 25658. Under this law, it is illegal to do the following:

    • Sell alcohol to a minor, anyone under the age of 21.
    • Buying alcohol as a minor is illegal.
    • It is a misdemeanor to give alcohol to a minor who then gets into a car accident for driving while drunk.
    • It is a misdemeanor to allow a minor to consume alcohol on business property regardless if the person knew the minor was under 21 or not.

    BPC 25658 is just one of several state laws that restrict the usage of alcohol amongst minors. For instance, BPC 25662 makes it illegal for a minor to even be in possession of alcohol.

    Under these two laws, a minor can never posses or consume alcohol, not even if their parent or legal guardian allows them to have the alcohol. While that particular instance may be okay in some states, it is illegal here in California. Minors can never have alcohol. This is further confirmed by DUI laws related to minors.

    When it comes to driving while intoxicated, adults have to worry about having a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08%. Minors get into trouble if they have a BAC over 0.01%.

    Penalties of Breaking These Laws

    In most instances of minors with alcohol, both the minor and the adult that provided them with the alcohol will face consequences. The exact consequences that a person will face are dependent on which law was broken. In most instances, the person will face misdemeanor charges.

    When a minor is caught with alcohol in their possession, under BPC 25662, they face misdemeanor charges. This includes:

    • A $250 fine for first time offenses. A $500 fine for subsequent offenses.
    • 24 -32 hours of community service, either at an alcohol/drug treatment center or a county coroner’s office.
    • Participation in a youth drunk driver program.
    • 1 year driver’s license suspension or a 1 year delay in acquiring a driver’s license.

    Breaking BPC 25658, whether as a minor consuming alcohol or as an adult providing alcohol to a minor, is a misdemeanor offense. Someone accused of this crime faces:

    • Up to 6 months in county jail.
    • A max fine of $1,000.

    If a minor is caught driving while under the influence of alcohol with a BAC of 0.01%, they will face a 1 year suspension of their driver’s license under Vehicle Code (VC) 23136. This is the state’s zero tolerance law for underage drinking and driving.

    If a minor is caught driving with a BAC of 0.05% or greater, they will face consequences under VC 23140. This is the states underage DUI law. It comes with the following, infraction level consequences:

    • No jail time.
    • 1 year driver’s license suspension.
    • 3 months of mandatory alcohol education program.

    If a minor has a BAC of 0.08% or higher, than they can be charged with regular DUI, which carries harsher consequences.

    Don’t Give Minors Alcohol

    Alcohol can be enjoyable, when consumed responsibly. Minors under the age of 21 are often not mature enough to handle alcohol. This can lead to them over consuming, and then putting themselves into dangerous or life-threatening situations, which is why they are prohibited from drinking. This is also why it is such a big deal for adults to give alcohol to minors.

    With the holiday season starting up, there will be a lot more parties and a lot more alcohol around. If anyone has family visiting from other states where minors are allowed to consume alcohol when their parent or legal guardian permits it, inform them that California sees things differently.

    What do you think of California’s take on minors and alcohol? Is the state taking the right precautions or does it need to loosen up a bit? Let us know what you think in the comments down below.